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Teacher Salaries

Discussion in 'The Swarm Lounge' started by TheSilasSonRising, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. 4shotB

    4shotB Moderator Staff Member

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    IMO, more money will attract the type of candidates who are now choosing to go into the sciences, engineering or business school. Over time, that will improve the talent pool. WTBS, I was amazed when I started teaching at how little content knowledge affects one's effectiveness. Of course, you have to know your subject matter (and the kids figure out really quick who does and who doesn't) but I would say that content knowledge is only 10-20% of the equation. I'm not sure what you can do to teach the other 80 - 90%. But we all saw it at GT - brilliant professors who were not really good in the classroom.
     
  2. forensicbuzz

    forensicbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    I was going to comment on this in my previous post, but it was already long enough. Really, this whole derailing of this thread could be moved to a different forum, but whatever.

    I hate the entire concept of a living wage for teachers. Teachers should be venerated. We should want the very best minds teaching our children, so pay them enough to attract them. I went to HS in a relatively affluent town in Connecticut. In a class of 330, about 20% went to Ivy League schools or equivalents. 98% of my graduating class started college the next fall. It was mostly the 3rd quartile kids that were going into Education.

    I think that there are great teachers everywhere. I think that many teachers follow that path because they feel called to it, whether they started in Education or gravitated towards it. Now, that being said, I think with the higher salaries, there is more competition for each available position, and there is significantly more scrutiny on performance, so the chances of having a subpar teacher is less.

    I have always felt that if we want the brightest minds teaching our kids, then we need to pay them equivalently to what they'd be able to make in the private sector. I think NTHS approaches this as much as I've seen anywhere. It's hard to differentiate the test scores at NT based on socioeconomics or educational opportunity, but NT is ranked pretty highly nationally in comparison to other open enrollment campuses.

    NTHS has about 4,000 students on two campuses. There's a freshman-only campus, and a 10-12 grade campus. The resources these kids have is incredible. I would equate NTHS to a community college, and the size can be overwhelming for some kids. Because there are so many kids it can be hard to make certain sports teams or academic teams or other activities. However, there are more club activities and intramural opportunities that we had at Tech when I was there. I think NTHS does a fantastic job of not losing kids in the cracks. This school has always been on the cutting edge of teaching techniques, and were one of the first schools to implement SEL (Social and Emotional Learning) into their curriculum.

    Having said all this, we moved to Chicagoland with my oldest was going into 8th grade. We didn't intend to be in this school district, but when I changed jobs in 2014 and started working in the western suburbs, I decided to commute over an hour each way every day to keep my kids in this district. I don't know if it will make a difference, but who doesn't want to give their kids every opportunity for success. @Skeptic I wouldn't call it luck; it was a conscious decision to live a more modest life to provide more opportunity for our children's education.
     
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  3. SidewalkJacket

    SidewalkJacket Helluva Engineer

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    Completely agree. You either have it, or you don't. Unfortunately, this
    The issue I took with your post is this: you used an outlier statistic to apparently back up the arrogant and misinformed post of someone taking shots at public school teachers. I'm glad the teachers in your ritzy district get compensated well. I wonder if the average salary you listed includes administrators and superintendents. If so, it'll be pretty skewed.
     
  4. forensicbuzz

    forensicbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    Go back and look at the links I included. You can see every single teacher's salary if you care to. I think the starting salaries for full-time teachers is comparable to top salaries at most other schools.

    BTW, I wasn't backing up anyone's post. I was just commenting that there are some school districts that get it right in my opinion. From the remainder of my posts, I think you see where I fall regarding public school teachers.
     
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  5. knoxjacket

    knoxjacket Helluva Engineer

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    I think the definition of what a teacher is needs to change. I would favor a much more distributed model with online lessons being delivered by the best of the best instructors and teachers serving more of a tutor role.

    I also believe the system of having year-based grade levels should be changed to a series of certifications by subject. I.E. a student can move on to Geometry as soon as they are certified in Algebra I. This would allow all students to operate at their own pace.

    The current classroom and school setup is so outdated. It reflects a time when knowledge wasn’t so readily available.
     
  6. SidewalkJacket

    SidewalkJacket Helluva Engineer

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    I can tell. I just got a little fired up on this one and trying to post and respond while totally distracted.
     
  7. Skeptic

    Skeptic Helluva Engineer

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    When I used the word I meant it in the sense that a lot of people, way too many people, don't have that opportunity or chance. Not that you just happened into it. It's commendable and actually I have seen it often, and if it means anything -- it might not -- almost always from college educated parents, many of whom had parents who also went to college. My saddest experience was trying to tutor a 12-year-old in reading who lived in a home with no books, magazines, newspapers or advertising material. Just TV. Nothing else. I confess to having no luck with him. I can't imagine being a teacher and dealing with that daily.
     
  8. pbrown520

    pbrown520 Helluva Engineer

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    That is unbelievable. The cost of real estate must be atrocious in this area. I do believe in paying teachers much more money than they currently make in the vast majority of places. Don't think these numbers make sense for most areas, but teachers should definitely be paid much more.
     
    ATL1 likes this.
  9. MikeJackets1967

    MikeJackets1967 Helluva Engineer

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    I'd be very nervous to live in Chicago with the gangs and crime:eek:
     
  10. forensicbuzz

    forensicbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    yep. My mortgage is 3.5X what it was in Atlanta for the same house. about $1500 of that goes to property taxes.
     
  11. forensicbuzz

    forensicbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    This is TIC, right?

    You do know there's as much gang activity in Atlanta as there is in Chicago, right? It's isolated in Chicago the same way it's isolated in Atlanta. That would be like saying you'd be nervous to live in Vinings or Morningside because of the gang violence and crime in Atlanta. No, more like being nervous living in John's Creek.
     
    MikeJackets1967 likes this.
  12. MikeJackets1967

    MikeJackets1967 Helluva Engineer

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    Wow I didn't know that(y) Thanks for the info;)
     
  13. forensicbuzz

    forensicbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    i still can't tell if that was TIC and this is sarcasm.
     
  14. MikeJackets1967

    MikeJackets1967 Helluva Engineer

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    A lot of stuff I had read said it was very dangeroua to just be in Chicago.;) It's nice to hear your point of view(y)
     
  15. GTHomer

    GTHomer Helluva Engineer

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    I agree, this is another topic that is worthy of a separate thread. As the product of two teachers and the spouse of one, I appreciate those on this blog that are in that profession. Yes, our first teachers are our parents however when we work collaboratively with them, teachers can be the spark to ignite long term learning for everyone in our society.
     
  16. awbuzz

    awbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    Many assume that all public school teachers are in a "traditional" union. I know Cobb County teachers are not "in the union". However too many that are get protected from being fired / let go due to tenure. The few "bad apples" crap it up for the good teachers.
     
  17. awbuzz

    awbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    Wish we could be back as a tax credit ALL of the various supplies and learning tools my wife has purchased and used over the last decade. $250 a year MIGHT cover it on average , but only because she is frugal and we have "fixed" many that wear out, etc.
     
  18. awbuzz

    awbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    My wife teaches at a Title 1 school. BIG difference on what the kids there have had exposure to at home compared to those in middle to upper middle income areas for sure.
     
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  19. bwelbo

    bwelbo Helluva Engineer

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    Yep. I look at what we deal with and what control we have...and then compare that to say a single mom working 2 jobs to make ends meet and doesn't have time or energy to chase the kids around. Tough stuff. I mean even just basic stuff like what do you do when a kid is sick or school starts late/ends early due to weather...
     
    awbuzz likes this.
  20. Whiskey_Clear

    Whiskey_Clear Banned

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    The murder rate is quite a bit higher in Chitown.
     

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