JT and Byerly Style

33jacket

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Georgia
I would like to hear from former players or coaches or other knowledgeable fans. Does Justin's blazing breakaway potential make the defense overly protective of losing contain on the quarterback, thereby opening opportunities on the toss or the pass? It seems that even if you stop JT five out of six tries, the sixth might still be there to burn you. How difficult is he going to be to defend? And how much more of an added dimension will it be if he can routinely make the good toss on the edge, or throw for meaningful yards 18 or 20 times a game?

absolutely. You ever see a MLB spy a running QB? The DC had to alter their classic scheme due to that threat. Same with a dynamic QB in the option. If you fear his speed so much that you can't catch up, the risks you will take change...you will tend to need to keep someone back or safe. If you feel like you can take a risk but the defenders can catch him due to less speed etc, you take risks. Its a fear factor.

The fact is you need elite athleticism no matter what system you play if you want to be one of the big boys. Some systems put that on the RB and WR ala UGA or Bama. Some put it on the QB and RB (auburn, oregon), some like ours, puts it on the QB, RB in a different fashion. But the QB in a system like ours, oregons, auburns needs to be elite. The issue is, he also has to execute it too. So my point is here all things considered equal you go with JT. If TB is a little better at reading it, executing it....just a little...JT still wins out. If TB is so much better than JT today, then that athleticism may not win out and you start TB....
 

dressedcheeseside

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absolutely. You ever see a MLB spy a running QB? The DC had to alter their classic scheme due to that threat. Same with a dynamic QB in the option. If you fear his speed so much that you can't catch up, the risks you will take change...you will tend to need to keep someone back or safe. If you feel like you can take a risk but the defenders can catch him due to less speed etc, you take risks. Its a fear factor.

The fact is you need elite athleticism no matter what system you play if you want to be one of the big boys. Some systems put that on the RB and WR ala UGA or Bama. Some put it on the QB and RB (auburn, oregon), some like ours, puts it on the QB, RB in a different fashion. But the QB in a system like ours, oregons, auburns needs to be elite. The issue is, he also has to execute it too. So my point is here all things considered equal you go with JT. If TB is a little better at reading it, executing it....just a little...JT still wins out. If TB is so much better than JT today, then that athleticism may not win out and you start TB....
All this I agree with considering neither guy has a propensity for turnovers.
 

Josh H

Jolly Good Fellow
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324
That's not how running the triple option works. You're always thinking "give" unless the read key takes it, then "keep" until the next read takes that, then "pitch." If you think "pitch first", the whole thing breaks down.

The Georgia Southern Option Playbook contradicts you on this point:

"In a double option play the quarterback can't come down the line of scrimmage to option number three, hesitate and then decide whether to pitch the ball to the tailback or not pitch the ball. The decision can be predetermined for the quarterback with a one way decision making process. The one way decision-making process removes any hesitancy because the process instructs the QB exactly what to do when he reaches number three. The one way decision-making process instructs the QB to pitch the ball off number three, until number three won't allow him to pitch the ball"

That's the specific quote for a double-option play, but it goes on to state that the "option" portion of a triple option uses the same decision process.

http://fastandfuriousfootball.com/w...legeoffense2/1990 GSU Paul Johnson Option.pdf

DISCLAIMER: Take this all with a grain of salt....I never played football.
 

iceeater1969

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6,658
Especially early in the year Who ever is the starter , the coaches should find way to get playing time for the backups during the middle part of the game. Surely we could have some special play they are ready to perform. This will motivate them and keep opponent off balance and most important AVOID EGGS ONE BASKET. End of game starter to hence early as possible to turn over to backup and his backup. If we are all in on "one" guy, this sends big time negative vibes across team and and future recruits and it is really just gambling.

For qb this must be done. I feel good about all three qb . By end of year each should feel they have been given a shot. Rest of team will see this and each of qb will accept and alternate role if asked.

This is just good leadership.

For the team the goal is to win 7 with 2 against the big 4 and show progress at then end of year. 2015 schedule is a beast.
THWG.
 

Josh H

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
324
For the team the goal is to win 7 with 2 against the big 4 and show progress at then end of year. 2015 schedule is a beast.
THWG.

If we pull off two wins against the big 4, we'd better have more than 7 wins. Tulane, Georgia Southern and Elon are gimme wins if we show up. NC State and Virginia both went 0-8 in ACC play next year, that should be 5. North Carolina, Pitt, and Duke are the next tier. North Carolina is due against us, but we should be the better team vs. Duke and Pitt. Win all of those and you are at eight wins (I think we'll drop one, probably at North Carolina). Take 2 from the Big 4 and you're at 9 wins.

9 wins is a pretty good year. 10 wins is a great year. More than that, and it's a special year.
 

Essobee

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Gas Pump #1
JT dances a bit and can be taken down by an arm or a hand. But, give him an inch and he will take a mile. The two clips below have two main plays that shows JT's "miss" followed by his "home run"


JT's asset is his speed, but he's got to use it to be effective. 'nuff with the dancing, already. 'nuff said.
 

Essobee

Jolly Good Fellow
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Gas Pump #1
Byerly does not dance but charges with no fear. He Make significant yards after contact. The next two clips shows several plays where people get a hand/arm on him and he keeps on going. Some people get their whole body on him and he keeps on going. Some several people get on top of him and he keeps on going.



I like this kid's style.
 

alaguy

Helluva Engineer
Messages
1,117
I would like to hear from former players or coaches or other knowledgeable fans. Does Justin's blazing breakaway potential make the defense overly protective of losing contain on the quarterback, thereby opening opportunities on the toss or the pass? It seems that even if you stop JT five out of six tries, the sixth might still be there to burn you. How difficult is he going to be to defend? And how much more of an added dimension will it be if he can routinely make the good toss on the edge, or throw for meaningful yards 18 or 20 times a game?

It wasn't by accident that if you look at a bunch of game stats the last few yrs--the QB got a lot of carries but had 2.6 ypp avg.The def dictated who got the ball knowing there was a good chance he wasn't going to hurt them.The clem game here in '11? was the only game that remember QB killing it vs a one of the big 4.
er, I'm glad JT ran wild on syr but so would have Brady Swilling that day.
 

ilovetheoption

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2,510
The Georgia Southern Option Playbook contradicts you on this point:

"In a double option play the quarterback can't come down the line of scrimmage to option number three, hesitate and then decide whether to pitch the ball to the tailback or not pitch the ball. The decision can be predetermined for the quarterback with a one way decision making process. The one way decision-making process removes any hesitancy because the process instructs the QB exactly what to do when he reaches number three. The one way decision-making process instructs the QB to pitch the ball off number three, until number three won't allow him to pitch the ball"

That's the specific quote for a double-option play, but it goes on to state that the "option" portion of a triple option uses the same decision process.

http://fastandfuriousfootball.com/wp-content/uploads/collegeoffense2/1990 GSU Paul Johnson Option.pdf

DISCLAIMER: Take this all with a grain of salt....I never played football.


This is how I've heard it coached as well.

The QB's internal dialogue on a triple option play that ends up in a keeper goes

"give give give KEEP! pitch pitch pitch KEEP!"
 

Boomergump

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It wasn't by accident that if you look at a bunch of game stats the last few yrs--the QB got a lot of carries but had 2.6 ypp avg.The def dictated who got the ball knowing there was a good chance he wasn't going to hurt them.The clem game here in '11? was the only game that remember QB killing it vs a one of the big 4.
er, I'm glad JT ran wild on syr but so would have Brady Swilling that day.
I am not as convinced that the defense DICTATED who got the ball, so much as a timid QB who strung plays out into oblivion rather than forcing defenders to commit, made the plays ineffective.
 
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