Coming to New Orleans?

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Hey, I'm a Tulane season ticket holder. A couple of years ago a visiting Syracuse fan came to our board and asked some questions about visiting New Orleans, I responded by posting an email I had sent to a friend who was also visiting that weekend. Apparently, the email ended up proving very useful for a large number of Syracuse fans on their fanboard, so I thought I'd post it here in case it is helpful to any of you who may not be familiar with New Orleans.

Also, if any of you are considering tailgating and have questions, let me know. I run one of the largest tailgates at TU and have insight. But be forewarned, with this being the first time we’ve done it on campus (in over forty years) even we have a lot of “we’ll see how it feels/gos”

Hope to see a lot of you at Yulman in September, hope this posted email is helpful to someone, and hope you enjoy your trip to New Orleans more than you enjoy us beating you into the ground


Seriously, good luck this season (except our game).

Part One:
Things you asked about:
You asked about Willa Mae's Scotch House, which Food Network (not that I trust them) rates the country's best chicken. I've been there 7-8 times and all but once it rated as my favorite fried chicken ever. I had one so-so experience, other than that its been stellar. They don't have a website, but here is the yelp link --> http://www.yelp.com/biz/willie-maes-sco... ew-orleans The times on yelp are (unless something has changed VERY recently) incorrect. It is ONLY open for lunch (closing around 2 or 3, but often cutting the line off sooner), and it is closed on Sundays. Meanwhile, the lines can get VERY long, especially on weekends. It is up to you, but if you are serious about going, I would suggest that we go on Friday (while Brittany is teaching) and that we should get there 1130-noonish. An order of fried chicken (3 pieces of fried chicken plus one very large side dish) is 10 dollars.

You also asked about the Creole Creamery. It is VERY near our old house, and is not super distant from our new house (though much too far to walk). It is fast becoming a New Orleans institution. Crazy flavors, that are (mostly) crazy good (some are bad.....but they are big on taste tests). Sundays and Milkshakes are also good. Ice Cream is reasonable, but sundaes and shakes are a bit expensive.....but the portions for those are big and come the old fashioned way in glass service. Website --> http://www.creolecreamery.com/

Fine dining:
You said you wanted to get a nice meal out and mentioned Commander's and Galatoire's as examples. I'll share what I know:

~ Commander's is a 5 minute walk from our house (tops). It has a cool atmosphere that merges mom and pop with a elegant room. The service is exceptional, and the food is pretty good. We've been once for dinner, and thought it was good but were slightly underwhelmed (although the Turtle Soup was sublime). We went again for lunch and liked it much better. At dinner mains are in the 20s, appetizers in the low 10s. At lunch, they have (weekdays at least, I think maybe Saturdays too) a deal where you get a 3 course set lunch (with options) for about 20 bucks a head, and martinis are a quarter a piece (classic martini, commanders martini, watermelon martini, and cosmopolitans). I'm not joking. A quarter a piece. They are probably most famous for their Sunday Brunch. We've never been there for brunch, but did go to brunch at their #2 restaurant (Palace Cafe) which has a similar brunch meal, and it was quite good. Reservations are recommended if you want to eat at Commander's. In general, their menu is old-school creole cooking (or at least how it was re-imagined in the 1950s) and is quite good, if sometimes a bit unimaginative/unoriginal. For that type of food I certainly rank it over Antoine's (which can range from amazing to disgusting depending on the night) or Arnaud's (which is good, but I think I slightly prefer Commander's) Website --> http://www.commanderspalace.com/

~ Galatoire's is probably my personal favorite of the "old-school" fine dining eateries in NOLA, but it isn't for everyone. First off, the atmosphere in the lower dining room (the traditional dining room) is raucaus, loud, and breaks into happy birthdays. The service is great, but its unorthodoxed. It looks like a Paris cafe in the 1910s. Its a LOT of fun, and it IS old/real New Orleans, but it certainly isn't what most people picture when they think of fine dining. The upstairs dining room is more regal/subdued, although a whole host of New Orleanians are still boycotting the restaurant for adding the upstairs dining room because they don't consider it the "real" Galatoires. Second, the food is amazingly good, but surprisingly simple for fine dining. They offer some of the best quality meats/fishes ranging from Crawfish, to softshell crabs, to five different types of fish, to duck, etc (and your waiter will be shockingly honest about what is the freshest) and they cook them in a very traditional, but straightforward way that showcases the product/freshness. Its usually REALLY good but, again, not what the average New Yorker "pictures" as fine dining. The downstairs dining room does not take reservations (though if you go 8 or later you rarely have to wait), the upstairs dining room requires it. Main courses range in the 20s, appetizers in the low 10s. Their wine list is among the most extensive in the world. Website --> http://www.galatoires.com/

A couple of other options (just so you know your options)
~ Cochon is the new place that is getting thrown into the New Orleans foodie circuit. The Chef is Donald Link, who competes with John Besh (who I think sucks) and Susan Spicer (whose food I've never had) for best known local chef. He cooks pig every way you can possibly imagine it. Its a love affair with pork. Both times I have been there his appetizers (8-13 dollars) are the best apps I've had in my life. Both times his entrees (18-23 dollar range) have been better than so-so, but not as good as the appetizers. Although his rabbit and dumplings (chicken and dumplings with rabbit) and pulled pork cheeks were pretty darn good. The atmosphere is definately nice, and more subdued than Galatoire's, but it tries to give off a bit of a casual, deep-south vibe to it. And he has things on the menu like cocktails that use RC cola, and pickled okra. etc. Reservations are probably a good idea, but not compulsory. We have his cookbook, and it is far and away the best Cajun cookbook I've ever used. Website --> http://www.cochonrestaurant.com/

~ Boucherie is really popular cause its really good, original, high end food for really low prices (the chef is outspokenly dedicated to low prices). The dining room is TINY (its the inside of an old house) and reservations are required, and even then expect them to run 20 minutes late, but once inside the service and food are very good. Apps are 8-11, entrees 13-19. Tons of hard corps meat cooked old french style. Particularly famous for their Krispy Kreme Bread Pudding and their Bacon Chocolate Brownie (5 bucks each). The chef just got shot last week in a mugging, and didn't have health insurance, so I don't know what will happen to the menu/prices. He also keeps a good selection of Basque wines, which is why Brittany likes it haha The website is --> http://www.boucherie-nola.com/

~ I mentioned Antoine's and Arnaud's, and those are the other two big "classic" ones besides Galatoire's/Commander's. Antoine's is slightly cheaper than some of the others, so we have been there twice. It is an amazing place that is like a museum of food, showcasing how it was truly cooked in 1880 (rather than how it was reimagined in 1950). The problem is that they have almost 300 tables, tons of tourists, and the food is uneven/unpredictable at best. Our first experience was great....the second one produced food that was bordering on disgusting (including a congealed dish that made me sick to look at......and it was the SAME dish I had loved the first time......point being, inconsistent). Talking to other people has provided me evidence that our experiences are pretty indicative......that they are super inconsistent. That said, their soups are particularly famous/good.....and the service is as good as it gets. The first time they gave us a free cookbook just because they liked us, and the second time, when they saw us debate which soup to order, they brought us out a full bowl of options #2 and 3 on the house as a gift so we could try all three. I want to like Antoine's so bad because, in theory, its the real thing. But I worry about recommending it because of inconsistency. As for Arnaud's, its kind of if Galatoire's and Commander's got married. We've been there once, and it was good, but, to me, I'd suggest going to one or the other, not the hybrid (Arnaud's).

~Herbsaint. Co-run by Donald Link (of Cochon) and Susan Spicer, this is Food and Wine Mag's favorite restaurant in the city. And the two times we've been there it was pretty d*** good. A heavy New Orleans influence, but it is less "pure" New Orleans than the other options in this category. The menu is highly inventive however, and seems to always taste even better than it sounds. Mains 18-25, apps 9-13. Reservations recomended. Website --> http://www.herbsaint.com/

~Bayona. Susan Spicer’s restaurant is in the French quarter (surprisingly quiet considering it is one block off Bourbon). Exquisite food. New Orleans meets Spain meets Asia. If you want international style fine dining that never lets you forget that you are in New Orleans, this is (by far) the best place to go in the city.


~Pesche. Donald Link’s woodfire seafood restaurant, Acadian/Cajun ingredients but inspired by his trips to the Basque Country and Uruguay. Yum. Just won the James Beard for best new restaurant in US. So make reservations. Not super expensive though.


If we were ranking our top five fine dining in the city right now, I’d probably go 1) Bayona 2) Cochon 3) Herbsaint 4) Pesche 5) Galatoire’s (with a special nod out to Boucherie for being super close in spite of being a really cheap price)
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Part Two
Other food
~ You might consider Camelia Grill. It is a diner that doesn't really do anything other than being a diner (greasy spoon food etc) but its wacko famous with locals, open 24 hours (or close to it), and a lot of fun because even though its a diner and you sit on stools, they serve you on linen napkins with cloth gloves as they serve you. Their burgers, omelets, and club sandwiches are especially good, and there isn't a one of them that is over 5 bucks....most are under 4. It might be an option the night you land if you are hungry after the airplane. There is also one in the Quarter now, but it doesn’t count J Website --> http://www.camelliagrill.net/home.htm

~Mother's. Similar to Camelia. Best known for breakfast. Its more famous with tourists than Camelia, less famous with locals. Both times I've been there I thought the food was pretty bad, and the lines long. But some people swear by it, so you should at least be aware.http://www.mothersrestaurant.net/

~ La Boulangerie. Less than a mile from our house, this traditional french bakery makes bread and breakfast stuff just like they do in France (or at least close to it). No website, but yelp --> http://www.yelp.com/biz/la-boulangerie-new-orleans-3

~ Butcher. Next door to Cochon and owned/operated by the same guy (Donald Link), its his sandwhich shop. One could eat in, or pack a picnic from here. Website --> http://www.cochonbutcher.com/

~Po-Boys. Option A: My favorite po-boy place is near our new house, and its called Mahoney's. The former sous chef at Arnaud's gave up fine dining to follow his dream of opening a Po-Boy shop after he heard about Willa Maes being a finalist for a Michelin Star. And open a po-boy shop he did. These aren't your momma's po-boys, but he does everything the traditional style and on the traditional bread, and they are very good, if a bit expensive (or at least the seafood ones are). The cochon-de-lais (pulled pork) is really good and pretty reasonable, but a lot of the seafood ones are more expensive because he uses only fresh louisiana seafood. But they are good. Several restaurants buy their seafood directly from him because they can't figure out where he gets it from. Website -->http://mahonyspoboys.com/ Option B: If you want the traditional, old-school mom and pop po boy, I think the best one is at Guy's (just around the corner from our old house).Nothing as original as Mahoney's, but they do you right. Website --> http://guyspoboys.com/

~ Cafe du Monde: I find their beignets to be heaven (though you can get a bad batch when they are either too busy or not busy enough). I definitely recommend you NOT get beignets at Cafe Beignet.

Other potential activities you might not think about (especially ones good on a budget)
~ Ferry to the westbank. A ferry that takes passengers (and cars) from next to the french quarter to algiers and back runs until 6 PM (every 15-20 minutes), and is free for foot/bicycle traffic, and only 1 dollar for cars. And you get to see the city from the river. Also, Algiers provides a nice park along the river (with views) and benches for picnicking. Another ferry leaves from the same spot next to the french quarter and runs to Gretna, which is about 3 miles upriver. Not much to do there, but that is an even better boat ride and gives you even more views (including of our house, which you can see from the Gretna ferry!). That ferry runs once about ever 40 minutes or so. We sometimes ride our bikes to the ferry, take it to algiers, ride it along the levee, and come back on the gretna ferry. The Gretna ferry does not take cars. Also, of late, the Gretna ferry has occasionally been closed and the Algiers ferry closed to cars, depending on things malfunctioning

~ Cemetery. There is an old-school above ground cemetary right across from Commander's (so very close to where we live). Its neat, and free. Though opening hours vary. This website has pictures --> http://www.graveaddiction.com/1lafayette.html

~The Avenue Pub. A craft beer pub and appetizer bar on St Charles Avenue between our house and the Quarter, they have 42 rotating beers (mostly craft beers) and tons more on bottle. The dive-bar atmosphere disguises a serious beer culture, with good bar food (think french fries cooked in duck fat, and red beans and rice wontons). The bar itself is open usual bar hours (with a back patio as well), and their is an upstairs patio overlooking St Charles Avenue that opens at 4 PM. I believe they also have a deal where you get a burger, fries, and a pint for 10 bucks 4-7 PM thursday through saturday. Website --> http://theavenuepub.com/

~ St Joe's Bar. Near our old house, this bar has a GREAT backyard patio and is famous for their Blueberry Mojitos. Also cool for all of their old-school religious art which adorns the bar in a mocking way. No website, but Yelp! --> http://www.yelp.com/biz/st-joes-bar-new-orleans

~NOLA Brewery tour. OK, I know I know, everyone has taken a brewery tour. But here is the thing. This craft microbrewery is (literaly) 150 yards (tops) from our house, and only gives one tour a week (usually led by the President and CEO). Small little snifters for tasting you ask? Why no, not at all. You arrive and are handed a pint glass which you can fill from one of 5 different types of ale to fill at your leisure. Drink through it during the tour? You can leave the tour and get your own refill. But you don't want to go at the end of the tour? They happily encourage you to stay and try more beer when the tour is over. And guess what else you might ask? Its all free. Free as a bird. And it ain't bad beer either. Tours are on Fridays at 2 PM. Rumors now that it is five bucks a ticket. Still a great deal.

~ The zoo. I'm not a huge zoo person, but it is a very nice one (even if a bit small) and they have a very good cajun/swamp exhibit with alligators, albino alligators, brown bear, otter, nutria, etc. The zoo is uptown by Audobon Park. There is also an Acquarium down by the French Quarter. As well as an insecterium, but count me out on that one!

~ Live music. While its harder to find authentic jazz and/or NOLA music than it used to be, it certainly isn't impossible. Go for Frenchman's Street (Bourbon is for boobs haha) or a couple of specific joints uptown. We can help if you are interested.


NOLA things you might want to try besides what you might already know about
~Many American cocktails were born here, and bitters were invented here. In particular, a drink called Sazerak (sp?) made with whiskey. Can be found at many good bars.

~Snowballs. You probably will be here too late in the year for these stands to be open, but did you know that the snowball was invented in New Orleans? Had tons of watery, tastless snow-cones in your day? Why yes, but that isn't a snowball......which is much better and more complex. Hanson's is particularly good --> http://snobliz.com/ but I'm almost certain they are closed by September.

~Cajun Food. While there is TONS of great Creole food to be had at our famous restaurants, cajun food is often cooked in a touristy way and not that great. Not only have we become much better cooks than we used to be, but the aforementioned Donald Link cookbook is shockingly authentic, and provides entry into a lot of dishes that are either 1) hard to find in restaurants or 2) hard to find a good example of in restaurants because most restaurants that serve it serve touristy versions (think Jambalaya, etc). If it helps the wallet, we are happy to cook for you. Just let us know.

~ Sucre. Fancified (and expensive) sweets and desserts. Particularly famous for their Macaroons. The place is scary good (which is why we try to avoid going there often haha), and an easy walk from our house. That said, it is more traditional french stuff than New Orleans stuff, so while it is everybit as good as similar places in New York etc, and almost as good as similar places in Paris, it isn't necessarily something you can only find in NOLA. But don't tell that to Food and Wine Mag which is currently in love with it. Website -->http://www.shopsucre.com/
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Part Three
The French Quarter (or as we say in NOLA simply "The Quarter" since French would seem redundant)
~ Bourbon Street. Gotta walk down it at least once. Overpriced, watered down hurricanes to go in super tall plastic cups cut in the shape of a naked woman, huge *** beer to go that tastes like soap for 7 dollars, 60 year old tourists flashing their *beep* out of season.......the epitome of class! OK, that was a sarcastic comment, but, seriously, you gotta go at least once. Its what EVERYone thinks of when they think of New Orleans. To make an analogy to Tolstoy's quote about St Petersberg visavis Russia, Bourbon Street is New Orleans, but Bourbon Street is not New Orleansian.

~ The best bar near Bourbon Street is Pat O'Brien's which has a glorious inner courtyard with a flaming fountain. It is a LOT of fun, though occasionally (far from always) overrun with hordes of tourists. Their hurricanes are usually much better than the ones on the street (though no less expensive), although they can sometimes be very watered down (but often aren't). Their electric lemonades are really good too. They also have a piano bar inside which is neat, but its hard to compete with the stunner of a courtyard. Website -->http://www.patobriens.com/patobriens/

~ Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop is on down Bourbon Street into the beginning of the residential section. Drinks are still pricey, but the fact that it is only lit by candlelight, and still looks much like it did when Jean Lefitte used to drink there, is pretty darn charming. Avoid all other bars that claim to be Pirate bars or are named after Jean Lefitte etc. They are just places with watered down hurricanes. This one is more like cheap beer at expensive prices, but a fun location. No website, but Yelp! --> http://www.yelp.com/biz/lafittes-blacks... ew-orleans

~ Pirates Alley Cafe. Ok one exception to no other pirate bar rule. This bar (behind St Louis Cathedral) has brought absinthe back home to NOLA (which had a HUGE absinthe culture in the 19th century). Never been to this bar, but if you want absinthe this is the place to go --> http://www.piratesalleycafe.com/

~ The Chart Room. Two blocks off Bourbon (towards the river). OK, this is a TOTAL dive bar, but if Quarter Prices are getting you down, 1.50 coors light served in a real, chilled mug might make you happy. And you might actually see a couple of locals (rare for the quarter) Yelp! --> http://www.yelp.com/biz/the-chart-room-new-orleans

~Preservation Jazz Hall. The only live music on Bourbon that isn't washed out country stars covering Achie Breakie Heart. Preservation is cheesey, touristy, and they keep pressuring you to buy more drinks, but it is far and away the most authentic old-school Dixie Land Jazz left in the city. Better (and more diverese options) live music and jazz can be found on Frenchman's (without the touristiness), but if you want Dixieland jazz, this is worth a stop. --> http://www.preservationhall.com/default_original.aspx

~ Galatoire's and Arnaud's (mentioned in the fine dining section) are both on Bourbon, and Antoine's is just off Bourbon. Cafe du Monde is also in the French Quarter (along the river).
 

kittysniper101

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
104
I wish I had the time and money to make it down. This is an awesome write up and all the food sounds amazing!
 

GTpdm

Helluva Engineer
Messages
1,213
Location
Atlanta GA
Waveprof:

(1) Thanks for stopping by, and for demonstrating the good taste to show up on the best GT board!

(2) Thanks for ruining my weekend, since I can't make it down to enjoy any of that huge list of great things NOLA has to offer.


(Aside: just, wow! Three huge posts, and not one mention of......wait—why was it that our team is going down to New Orleans this weekend? Something do do with futbol, iirc? All I know is, I just had a full meal and I'm really hungry right now!)
 

motynes

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
214
Location
Ocean Springs, Mississippi
I've gone to Bayona a number of times and it is fabulous. Also, if you go you must try the Sweetbreads. For breakfast there used to be this great place called Patunias (sp?) that is closed now, but the menu is continued at Oceana. I would not go to To the older places unless you just have to try one (i.e. Commander's, Galatiore's, etc.) as there are much better places like Bayona and Herbsaint. Susan Spicer is just and excellent chef. If you like music go to Frenchmen St. Several really cool bars including a saki bar that has old Kung fu movies playing on an old reel on the wall. Usually there is Brass band that play in the street and I've run into a lot of celebrities down there. Have to check out Pat O's as well and get a hurricane.

Nola is an amazing place. So have fun. My wife and I got 2-3 times a year and I've been heading to nola for sinc ei was a kid several times a year as I live and grew up an hour and half away.
 

redmule

Ramblin' Wreck
Messages
656
Love coming to Nawlins. Have read that there are three places that a Southerner can go and instantly feel at home: New Orleans, Charleston, Richmond. The first two are for sure. Glad to have Tulane back on the schedule. Wish you were in the ACC. Thanks for the classy post.
 

GT_B

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
492
NOLA is a crazy place. I've been about 5 times and each time is a different experience. I always like to check out a different bar or restaurant that I haven't been to each time I go. Last time I went my brother got bit by a police horse while on Bourbon street. Also went during the LSU/FL game a few years ago and I've never seen so many college girls puking in the street. Always an experience.
 

MWBATL

Helluva Engineer
Messages
4,438
Thanks for all the info.

However, last time I was there, the ferry no longer took cars. Has that changed (again)?
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Guess you plan to get too intoxicated to care ;)
I'll be too intoxicated by just being back on campus for the first time in my lifetime (I'm curtailing any tailgate drinking because of the heat). Usually the game is top dog for me. For once, it isn't.

That said (and I mean this nicely, I'm not the message board jack---, just trying to give my honest perspective) if I were laying money down on an even money bet, I'd lean Tulane. Not because I think we are great (we're not "there" yet) and not because I don't think you all are any good (I actually think you are better than a lot of your own fans seem to think you are).....but because I think we match up extremely well. For instance, we play Duke two weeks after you. I think you are a better team than Duke this year, but I am far, far more worried about that game from a TU perspective than I am GT. I went to VMI undergrad so I've seen a lot of triple option. Our speed on defense matches up well, and our secondary (based on last year, not last week) is a you-better-not-throw type of secondary (even for a passing team). I think our speed will make it difficult for you to stretch the field left to right running, and if you fall back on throwing.....watch out. Meanwhile, I think our passing game will have success. If our two biggest DL hadn't graduated, I'd be downright confident. But with them gone, it should be a good game. I will say this, if you get ahead early, you could STOMP us. Our team is young and fragile IMO.

You asked if I have questions, I am a bit curious about your QB. I know you had the guy transfer out a year ago, and that is (oddly) the position I've studied up the least about with GT. Do you like your guy?
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
I've gone to Bayona a number of times and it is fabulous. Also, if you go you must try the Sweetbreads. For breakfast there used to be this great place called Patunias (sp?) that is closed now, but the menu is continued at Oceana. I would not go to To the older places unless you just have to try one (i.e. Commander's, Galatiore's, etc.) as there are much better places like Bayona and Herbsaint. Susan Spicer is just and excellent chef. If you like music go to Frenchmen St. Several really cool bars including a saki bar that has old Kung fu movies playing on an old reel on the wall. Usually there is Brass band that play in the street and I've run into a lot of celebrities down there. Have to check out Pat O's as well and get a hurricane.

Nola is an amazing place. So have fun. My wife and I got 2-3 times a year and I've been heading to nola for sinc ei was a kid several times a year as I live and grew up an hour and half away.
Fully agree except I'd still put a plug in for Galatois. I think their food is that good, but the key is don't order off the menu (ever). Ask the waiter what's good that night and follow. It's a unique place that can't be judged by the same standards (good or bad) as other restaurants. That said, I'd still take (at least) Bayona, Cochon, Peche, and Herbsaint above it.
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Love coming to Nawlins. Have read that there are three places that a Southerner can go and instantly feel at home: New Orleans, Charleston, Richmond. The first two are for sure. Glad to have Tulane back on the schedule. Wish you were in the ACC. Thanks for the classy post.
I'm from Virginia, got my PhD in Columbia South Carolina (hated it, but LOVED Charleston), and now live in NOLA (my wife is a native here). I'll agree about Charleston and Nola. I'm so-so on Richmond. Even as a southerner, I liked NYC better (got my MA at NYU) than I did Richmond. Sorry if there are Richmond people on this board :) (I don't hate it, just don't love it)
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Thanks for all the info.

However, last time I was there, the ferry no longer took cars. Has that changed (again)?
You can have cars now, but they've done away with the Canal St to Gretna ferry altogether. But the Canal St to Algiers takes cars......but now it stops running at like 6 PM (so WAY less useful). Basically the people on the west bank didn't like to pay the dollar toll for the bridge (which funded the ferrys). As a city we voted, same time as at a presidential election (i.e. high turnout) to keep the toll/ferries, but then they took it to court and forced a revote because the vote was too close (30 votes)....the revote took place on a saturday in May and they shot down the toll, hence killing most of the ferry's and limiting the one that was most useful. Regardless of how anyone felt about the toll/ferries, I just found it really odd the WAY that went down.
 

waveprof

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
33
Location
Irish Channel, New Orleans
Reply to all who said nice things without having something specific for me to respond to----

Not a problem. I'm looking forward to this weekend and hope to see a lot of G Tech people there. We plan to make the trip either next year or in 2018 (we'd rather it be next year but not sure we'll be able to afford it). I've been to Atlanta a fair bit (having lived in Columbia SC for five years), but never to a Georgia Tech game (which I've heard is awesome) and never to The Varsity (which I feel I have to try). We'll probably spend Friday night in Athens (if that darn Georgia team is out of town) because I've always wanted to try Five and Ten, then swing into Atlanta on Saturday morning. Hope it happens next year, but for $$ reasons we may have to wait until the second half of this series.

And do have good luck the rest of the year, I'm pulling for y'all. Especially against UGA. The only two good things I can say about UGA is that I like Athens (though not as much as their fans fetishize it) and they beat LSU last year. I guess those are pretty good things though. But that's where my list runs dry.
 
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