How to pair the brilliant minds of GT students with GT Football = Better Results/Edge

ramblin_man

Ramblin' Wreck
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799
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Augusta,GA
So how do we best pair our GT Student super smart engineering minds with our football program to produce products and dissect data on our plays & players to gain an advantage over other teams who are able to outspend us. Plus these students could develop and have access to trials/samples on real athletes to improve and eventually mass produce products for the real world marketplace.
Take this article as a example where 4 GT students develop a product for around $100 that rivals the $40,000 gold standard device. https://coe.gatech.edu/news/2022/01/create-x-team-makes-big-strides-new-wearable-technology
There’s got to be an interesting opportunity within the “create-x-team program”.
 

MountainBuzzMan

Helluva Engineer
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1,246
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South Forsyth
I think if you come up with something. (And there are some really good things we could come up with) the opposing teams will also be able to quickly pick it up and use it against us.



It would need to be kept secret and maybe patented.
 

4shotB

Helluva Engineer
Retired Staff
Messages
3,777
I don't think you can engineer this issue and am probably in the minority on this. Organizations don't become great on the efforts of middle to lower management. The issue at GT remains one of leadership (or lack thereof) at the highest levels and the absolute will to be excellent. If those are fixed then we can discuss options such as you propose. In fact, if we fix what I suggest, they would be the ones looking at ideas such as yours.
 

4shotB

Helluva Engineer
Retired Staff
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3,777
Have all the millionaire engineering graduates donate half their portfolio to the GTAA(y)(y)(y)(y)(y)(y)

When I hear all the talk about all of our millionaire graduates I am very comfortable with the idea that in another 100 years or so, GT will be marketing the fact that 1 in every 1 of its graduates is a millionaire. That word still has leftover catchet that is somewhat meaningless in today's world. But it does make a nice recruiting gimmick I suppose to the unsuspecting.
 

gameface

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
177
Do like that turtle mascot and recommend a hook shot from half court. Seriously, the true sign of intelligence is realizing how much you do not know.
 

bigrabbit

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
86
Maybe innovation with NIL structures, internet/VC business models. You would hope we’re already doing heavy analytics, but who on our coaching staff has a heavy data modeling background? Something analogous to “getting on base” (moneyball) but for college football. The Oakland As main boundary condition was their salary budget. GT football has certain boundary conditions - take those into account and run models. I minored in OR in grad school, maybe like a dual simplex problem, or predictive analytics like structural equation modeling or something else.

What system do you run, what skills/key positions do you target (with recruiting effort and money) to maximize results? What are your KPIs, not based on coaching experience but on objective data?

Analytics, focused efficient targeted use of money. Form a create-x moneyball team. We’ve had the #1 I.E. school for decades, perfect fit. GT alums fund the team in exchange for GT exclusivity on college modeling, let them figure out how to monetize pro level models.
 

JacketOff

Helluva Engineer
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2,081
The problem with this concept is I’m not sure it’s even possible in football, especially at the college level. Analytic based game plans and team building works exponentially better at the pro level because there is way more parity between teams. The worst MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, etc. players compared to the best are still insanely closer in relative talent and skill levels than college players are. If the teams in the NFL haven’t figured out some “moneyball” system based primarily on analytics, it would basically be impossible for a college level team to do it. Especially one that’s in the mid tier in terms of talent level.

Analytics in MLB have lead to the 3 true outcomes (home runs, walks, strikeouts) to be the most prominent result of at bats. So power hitters and guys who get on base any way possible are the most sought after players. The NBA has all but eliminated the mid range jumper and most points come from behind the 3 point line or in the paint. Having a 4 and 5 that can shoot threes is insanely valuable, as are guards who can penetrate and score in the paint.

The NFL’s biggest analytic adjustments have been spreading the field and having mobile QBs. The reemergence of the tight end position within the last decade as well because of the mismatch potential it can cause.

The thing with all of those analytic based teams though, is that you have to have the players who are able to do what your analytics suggest are most valuable. In baseball you can’t have a lineup of 9 slap hitters and expect to win with home runs. In basketball you can’t have a guard who can’t shoot 3’s and run the offense through him (Ben Simmons). In the NFL you can’t line up a below average TE out wide and expect him to beat a safety downfield.

Analytics are important, but building your team around what the analytics say is even more important. I’m hoping the TE from Syracuse who can run, Sims developing into a more consistent passer, and utilizing Sims’ running abilities this year will be some big analytic adjustments from the new faces on staff. I’m not as familiar with the defensive side of the ball, so I don’t know what can be done there as far as analytics go. But surely it can be better.
 

ChicagobasedJacket

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
335
The problem with this concept is I’m not sure it’s even possible in football, especially at the college level. Analytic based game plans and team building works exponentially better at the pro level because there is way more parity between teams. The worst MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, etc. players compared to the best are still insanely closer in relative talent and skill levels than college players are. If the teams in the NFL haven’t figured out some “moneyball” system based primarily on analytics, it would basically be impossible for a college level team to do it. Especially one that’s in the mid tier in terms of talent level.

Analytics in MLB have lead to the 3 true outcomes (home runs, walks, strikeouts) to be the most prominent result of at bats. So power hitters and guys who get on base any way possible are the most sought after players. The NBA has all but eliminated the mid range jumper and most points come from behind the 3 point line or in the paint. Having a 4 and 5 that can shoot threes is insanely valuable, as are guards who can penetrate and score in the paint.

The NFL’s biggest analytic adjustments have been spreading the field and having mobile QBs. The reemergence of the tight end position within the last decade as well because of the mismatch potential it can cause.

The thing with all of those analytic based teams though, is that you have to have the players who are able to do what your analytics suggest are most valuable. In baseball you can’t have a lineup of 9 slap hitters and expect to win with home runs. In basketball you can’t have a guard who can’t shoot 3’s and run the offense through him (Ben Simmons). In the NFL you can’t line up a below average TE out wide and expect him to beat a safety downfield.

Analytics are important, but building your team around what the analytics say is even more important. I’m hoping the TE from Syracuse who can run, Sims developing into a more consistent passer, and utilizing Sims’ running abilities this year will be some big analytic adjustments from the new faces on staff. I’m not as familiar with the defensive side of the ball, so I don’t know what can be done there as far as analytics go. But surely it can be better.
All true. I think for defense the analytics suggest that if you are weak on the defensive line you have to blitz from each secondary spot or constantly simulate pressures.
 

bigrabbit

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
86
Who knows, analytics would make an interesting student project. Is there anyone on our coaching staff who reminds you of our sharpest students in terms of data analytics capacity? Coaches know tons from experience, but have all sorts of biases. Coaching and recruiting strategies that work elsewhere fail at GT due to unique boundary conditions.
 

Augusta_Jacket

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
6,093
Location
Augusta, Georgia
I don't think you can engineer this issue and am probably in the minority on this. Organizations don't become great on the efforts of middle to lower management. The issue at GT remains one of leadership (or lack thereof) at the highest levels and the absolute will to be excellent. If those are fixed then we can discuss options such as you propose. In fact, if we fix what I suggest, they would be the ones looking at ideas such as yours.

This, without proper funding, is just daydreaming with passion, which is where we are now.
 

Northeast Stinger

Helluva Engineer
Messages
6,885
The problem with this concept is I’m not sure it’s even possible in football, especially at the college level. Analytic based game plans and team building works exponentially better at the pro level because there is way more parity between teams. The worst MLB, NFL, NBA, NHL, etc. players compared to the best are still insanely closer in relative talent and skill levels than college players are. If the teams in the NFL haven’t figured out some “moneyball” system based primarily on analytics, it would basically be impossible for a college level team to do it. Especially one that’s in the mid tier in terms of talent level.

Analytics in MLB have lead to the 3 true outcomes (home runs, walks, strikeouts) to be the most prominent result of at bats. So power hitters and guys who get on base any way possible are the most sought after players. The NBA has all but eliminated the mid range jumper and most points come from behind the 3 point line or in the paint. Having a 4 and 5 that can shoot threes is insanely valuable, as are guards who can penetrate and score in the paint.

The NFL’s biggest analytic adjustments have been spreading the field and having mobile QBs. The reemergence of the tight end position within the last decade as well because of the mismatch potential it can cause.

The thing with all of those analytic based teams though, is that you have to have the players who are able to do what your analytics suggest are most valuable. In baseball you can’t have a lineup of 9 slap hitters and expect to win with home runs. In basketball you can’t have a guard who can’t shoot 3’s and run the offense through him (Ben Simmons). In the NFL you can’t line up a below average TE out wide and expect him to beat a safety downfield.

Analytics are important, but building your team around what the analytics say is even more important. I’m hoping the TE from Syracuse who can run, Sims developing into a more consistent passer, and utilizing Sims’ running abilities this year will be some big analytic adjustments from the new faces on staff. I’m not as familiar with the defensive side of the ball, so I don’t know what can be done there as far as analytics go. But surely it can be better.
Slightly off topic but I really wish Sims would become a run first quarterback with a bevy of designed plays for him. Get the secondary to start cheating up and watching the backfield and then burn ‘em with passes over the middle.

Hope the analytics say THAT 😊
 

SOWEGA Jacket

Helluva Engineer
Messages
1,442
It won’t happen because QB’s know they won’t get looks at the NFL if they are perceived as runners first. That’s the #1 reason Sims doesn’t run much. He knows he has to become a pocket passer to get a serious look. Watch his high school film vs. his GT film. In high school he just exploded on the run when the pass wasn’t there. Now, he holds it way to long and doesn’t run nearly as much. He has stated this in interviews.
 

Root4GT

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
380
It won’t happen because QB’s know they won’t get looks at the NFL if they are perceived as runners first. That’s the #1 reason Sims doesn’t run much. He knows he has to become a pocket passer to get a serious look. Watch his high school film vs. his GT film. In high school he just exploded on the run when the pass wasn’t there. Now, he holds it way to long and doesn’t run nearly as much. He has stated this in interviews.
Josh Allen ran in college about 27% as much as he passed. He was a #7 overall pick and is now one of the best QBs in the NFL. QBs can run in college and make it into The NFL.
 

seanfloyd18

Georgia Tech Fan
Messages
48
Josh Allen ran in college about 27% as much as he passed. He was a #7 overall pick and is now one of the best QBs in the NFL. QBs can run in college and make it into The NFL.
Not trying to be that guy, but 27% as much as he passed is NOT “run-first.” I get that you’re just showing that QBs can run and get to the NFL, but the comment before which I believe this train of thought is referencing is ‘wanting sims to be more of a run-first’ guy.

There’s gotta be a balance if you’re getting into the NFL; the days of the exclusive pocket passer are over. Josh Allen, Lamar Jackson, Kyler Murray, Joe Burrow (to an extent), and soon to be Kenny Pickett too, all use their legs to their advantage. (Edit: didn’t even mention Mahomes lol)

Sims already shows flashes of genius when he can get skinny between tacklers and extend plays; he needs to start hitting the easier passes and clean up reading defenses and progressions. Too often his problem was decision-making, albeit the OLine didn’t extend his decision-making time too well.
 

SOWEGA Jacket

Helluva Engineer
Messages
1,442
Josh Allen ran in college about 27% as much as he passed. He was a #7 overall pick and is now one of the best QBs in the NFL. QBs can run in college and make it into The NFL.
I know that. But Sims is nowhere near where Allen was in college passing the ball. Hence, Sims knows he HAS to learn to pass from the pocket to have any shot at the league. He talked about this in many interviews before and during his freshmen season as did Patenaude. In other words, his personal goals may not match up with winning games at GT because it’s obvious after 2 seasons that his best weapon is his legs, but he needs it to be his pocket passing. Obviously, we are all hoping that it all comes together this season in which case we’ll have a stud at the most important position. But this idea that Sims is going to run more isn’t going to happen because it will hurt his pro prospects. I’m sure all this was discussed with Long which is why he didn’t portal. Since I don’t care about the NFL I surely hope Sims comes out running because that’s what we need with our OLine. But if he does the backup better be ready.
 

Northeast Stinger

Helluva Engineer
Messages
6,885
I know that. But Sims is nowhere near where Allen was in college passing the ball. Hence, Sims knows he HAS to learn to pass from the pocket to have any shot at the league. He talked about this in many interviews before and during his freshmen season as did Patenaude. In other words, his personal goals may not match up with winning games at GT because it’s obvious after 2 seasons that his best weapon is his legs, but he needs it to be his pocket passing. Obviously, we are all hoping that it all comes together this season in which case we’ll have a stud at the most important position. But this idea that Sims is going to run more isn’t going to happen because it will hurt his pro prospects. I’m sure all this was discussed with Long which is why he didn’t portal. Since I don’t care about the NFL I surely hope Sims comes out running because that’s what we need with our OLine. But if he does the backup better be ready.
It’s a conundrum as you point out. Sims may or may not have any shot as a quarterback in the pros. To get to that goal will require a major jump in his current skill set. But getting that major jump could cost Tech 2-3 games.
 
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