Getting stronger...

Eastman

Helluva Engineer
Messages
1,289
Location
Columbia, SC
Totally agree with 33 jacket. Obviously a great bench press alone has little value but unless mobility, speed etc is compromised because of it, it is preferable to be the stronger man. I think excellence in the weight room often speaks to commitment and self discipline as well.
 

IEEEWreck

Ramblin' Wreck
Messages
587
Ever watch American Ninja Warrior or Sasuke? Those guys are physical specimens due to core and grip strength. You have to put it all together to see the full benefit.

Those guys (and ladies) bodies are built for a combination of running and climbing. I was at the Audubon Zoo in NOLA yesterday (I'm on my honeymoon) and was struck by the orangutans they have. Those monkey's arms are built like a runner's calves- incredible definition and substantial mass without being giant like Beefcake McLargehuge bodybuilder. There's something to that. Rockclimbers and swimmers have great upper body strength and will outbench dudes with chest circumferences twice their own. But lifting 300 lbs once doesn't matter to them. They need to lift over and over again for an hour or more.

There's something to the F=MA equation part, but it's more than just more weight. The weight is in a rather poor place to be useful if you think about players like opposing levers. Even if you're a ridiculous Broseph Onlybench, we're evolved to put our weight on our legs just like the orangutan is evolved to put weight on its arms. Sheer amount of butt and thighs makes the arms and pecs an afterthought in any application of human power. Now, all that to say 'why care about benching?' isn't a bad question, but it does have at least two good answers:

1. It's the last mile of the problem. Sometimes, the final 5% of force is the difference maker.

2. It's closest to the application of force, and so almost always available. The legs and butt are far heavier hitters, but they need your legs, spine, and arms to form a lever for them to act. Get pushed off axis or caught in bad form and you can't access your leg strength. The arms are right next to the body they interact with, applying force. Will it lose to a well positioned opponent every time? Yes. Can marginal cases and 3/4 of a second longer losing fights win games? Absolutely.

Edit: I bet you that football players have an intuitive grasp of statics that the rest of the class would envy. What the hell is a wrench? A football player knows by feeling.
 

dressedcheeseside

Helluva Engineer
Messages
13,675
Those guys (and ladies) bodies are built for a combination of running and climbing. I was at the Audubon Zoo in NOLA yesterday (I'm on my honeymoon) and was struck by the orangutans they have. Those monkey's arms are built like a runner's calves- incredible definition and substantial mass without being giant like Beefcake McLargehuge bodybuilder. There's something to that. Rockclimbers and swimmers have great upper body strength and will outbench dudes with chest circumferences twice their own. But lifting 300 lbs once doesn't matter to them. They need to lift over and over again for an hour or more.

There's something to the F=MA equation part, but it's more than just more weight. The weight is in a rather poor place to be useful if you think about players like opposing levers. Even if you're a ridiculous Broseph Onlybench, we're evolved to put our weight on our legs just like the orangutan is evolved to put weight on its arms. Sheer amount of butt and thighs makes the arms and pecs an afterthought in any application of human power. Now, all that to say 'why care about benching?' isn't a bad question, but it does have at least two good answers:

1. It's the last mile of the problem. Sometimes, the final 5% of force is the difference maker.

2. It's closest to the application of force, and so almost always available. The legs and butt are far heavier hitters, but they need your legs, spine, and arms to form a lever for them to act. Get pushed off axis or caught in bad form and you can't access your leg strength. The arms are right next to the body they interact with, applying force. Will it lose to a well positioned opponent every time? Yes. Can marginal cases and 3/4 of a second longer losing fights win games? Absolutely.

Edit: I bet you that football players have an intuitive grasp of statics that the rest of the class would envy. What the hell is a wrench? A football player knows by feeling.
The concept of the lever is taught extensively in 8th grade. (How many of you guys and describe and give examples of the 3 classes of levers?)
 

Animal02

Helluva Engineer
Messages
6,054
Location
Southeastern Michigan
Not to thread jack, but actually those are quite awesome. However, those are buttons...not levers. Get with the program. :p
Yeah, I caught that after I hit post.....still early in the morning.

My roommate at Tech and the push button in his car.....that is why I remember it.

AS for bench press......that has been the status simple for eons. I was never competition with the bench press.....my arms were too long. The guys with short arms in HS were pressing 300-400 (on a machine) while I was doing around 200-220. Those same guys could not curl 60 lbs, while I was working out with 120.
 

dressedcheeseside

Helluva Engineer
Messages
13,675
1. 3 speed on the column
2. 4 on the floor
3. 5 speed

3 different gear shift levers. Amiright? ;)
1st class lever: fulcrum between the input force and output force (gear shift, see saw)
2nd class lever: output force between the fulcrum and input force (wheel barrow)
3rd class lever: input force between the fulcrum and output force (baseball bat, broom)

**trivia: which kind of lever is the forearm when doing a bicep curl? Is it the same type of lever when doing a tricept extension? If not, which kind of lever is it?
 

takethepoints

Helluva Engineer
Messages
4,661
I'm in a little late on this, but there is one reason to include bench presses in an exercise program for football players: the push-and-dance form of "blocking" that is used today.

When you weren't allowed to move your hands away from your jersey – as was the case in my day – then bench presses were for the beach. Today, the ability to push off with your arms is a central part of blocking, especially pass blocking. That's why, for most teams, OLs waddle on to the field, sort of get down in a three point stance, dance out to hit the DLs, then push them with their hands. A "pan cake block" is often the result of pushing your opponent once you get him off balance, not actually, you know, hitting him. There are teams who don't do this – Stanford is a good example – but most do and you need upper body strength and a lot of weight to make it work. Same thing right back for DLs; they need the upper body strength to contend with all the grabbing going on out there.

For a team that cut blocks and does a lot of chips and downfield blocking – like some teams we know – bench presses are less of a priority. And, yes, good core strength will serve just as well. Still, you can see why teams still use the bench press as an exercise.
 

Ggee87

Helluva Engineer
Messages
1,046
Location
Douglasville, Georgia
Yeah, I caught that after I hit post.....still early in the morning.

My roommate at Tech and the push button in his car.....that is why I remember it.

AS for bench press......that has been the status simple for eons. I was never competition with the bench press.....my arms were too long. The guys with short arms in HS were pressing 300-400 (on a machine) while I was doing around 200-220. Those same guys could not curl 60 lbs, while I was working out with 120.
I'm one with long arms that could bench around 315. But I cannot curl very much weight at all. Once my arms get a little tired, it's over.
 

CornerBlitz

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
160
pushing yourself up off the field after Todd Gurley trucked you again trying to tackle him

picking yourself up off the field after another clemson WR blew by you

pushing the chest of your teammate after you make a tackle for a 5 yard gain like it was a big play on first down

on offense picking yourself up off the field after another whiff cut block

there are plenty of reasons GT players need to be strong in the bench.

So what have you done that's so impressive? Crap post.
 
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