In honor of Paul Johnson being at the game tomorrow... what's your favorite memory from his time as coach?

Jophish17

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
440
1698529368164.gif
 

4shotB

Helluva Engineer
Retired Staff
Messages
4,657
I hope CBK is trying to convince CPJ to become a consultant. That would be an instant upgrade to the coaching staff!
Consulting with CPJ is an instant upgrade to ANY FB staff, college or pro. He is that good at what he does. IIRC, he has worked with Bellicek (sp?)and the Baltimore Ravens. IMO, having Bill Bellicek ask for your opinion on anything FB related is like Derek Trucks asking you for tips on the slide guitar or Warren Buffett asking for your investing advice.
 

Northeast Stinger

Helluva Engineer
Messages
9,978
I wonder if he would tweak his offense now that he has had time to see the changes in the college game. He continued to stick with the way his offense was run even though the rules had changed some of his blocking schemes. He was a great play caller but recruiting and poor defense finally did him in. That last loss to UGA seemed to really drain his energy on the sidelines. He was probably ready to retire. He was very generous by not forcing a contract buyout. I have great respect for him and I am thankful for his years at Tech. He was a helluva coach.
He adapted his offense to the players he could get. Had two quarterbacks set to run a modified flexbone / pistol formation. One turned out to be Vad Lee, who couldn’t quite get with the system and the other ended his career with a catastrophic ATV accident.

Even Tevin ran a lot of pistol but when his receivers kept dropping balls (you know the one) CPJ had to figure out what gave the team the best chance to win.

People talked about him being stubbornly committed to a system. I never saw it that way. He was stubbornly committed to winning. And he was never going to run what “the big kids” were running if he couldn’t recruit like the big kids.

Smart. Realistic.
 

wrmathis

Ramblin' Wreck
Messages
887
Location
Bonaire GA
He adapted his offense to the players he could get. Had two quarterbacks set to run a modified flexbone / pistol formation. One turned out to be Vad Lee, who couldn’t quite get with the system and the other ended his career with a catastrophic ATV accident.

Even Tevin ran a lot of pistol but when his receivers kept dropping balls (you know the one) CPJ had to figure out what gave the team the best chance to win.

People talked about him being stubbornly committed to a system. I never saw it that way. He was stubbornly committed to winning. And he was never going to run what “the big kids” were running if he couldn’t recruit like the big kids.

Smart. Realistic.
And his offenses in Hawaii were slinging it all over the place and not just running.
 

Enuratique

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
321
I wonder if he would tweak his offense now that he has had time to see the changes in the college game. He continued to stick with the way his offense was run even though the rules had changed some of his blocking schemes. He was a great play caller but recruiting and poor defense finally did him in. That last loss to UGA seemed to really drain his energy on the sidelines. He was probably ready to retire. He was very generous by not forcing a contract buyout. I have great respect for him and I am thankful for his years at Tech. He was a helluva coach.
I was going to make a similar comment. Loved the CPJ era but between rule changes, Tobacco Road conspiring friendly schedules for our opponents (always a bye before playing us), and a general feeling that teams had figured out just enough to slow his offense down I think he was done. I would love to think about how he could tweak his blocking to negate the rule changes if at all possible. Lastly I wonder if the portal era would have allowed him to get even better “prototypical” kids…
 

stinger78

Helluva Engineer
Messages
2,461
Because of the memory of attending with my son, the FSU game in 2008 will be my most special moment. Cooper caused the fumble inside the 5 yard line to save the game.

The win over VPISU at night when they were ranked was also awesome.

Lastly, I can remember the relief when we finally beat the DWAGS in Paul's first year. It was glorious.

I wish we would have supported this man with all of our resources available, and I really think by now, we would have already had another special year or 2. I know everyone doesn't agree with me, but his genius always gave us a chance when our talent did not.
We darn sure wouldn't have walked into the abyss we've been in. But... that's all history now.
 

ThatGuy

Ramblin' Wreck
Messages
875
Location
Evergreen, CO
Consulting with CPJ is an instant upgrade to ANY FB staff, college or pro. He is that good at what he does. IIRC, he has worked with Bellicek (sp?)and the Baltimore Ravens. IMO, having Bill Bellicek ask for your opinion on anything FB related is like Derek Trucks asking you for tips on the slide guitar or Warren Buffett asking for your investing advice.
Also Urban Meyer. IIRC, while he was at Utah he picked CPJ’s brain a lot. Then he went to Florida, and the rest of the “spread offense” took off, with a lot of its roots in the option.
 

ThatGuy

Ramblin' Wreck
Messages
875
Location
Evergreen, CO
As for my favorite memory, I loved so many of them. But I just thought of a favorite thing - the way CPJ ran in plays from the sidelines.

Countless announcers and commentators remarked at it with a chuckle, calling it “old school.” Some of them, like Kirk Herbstreit, loved it and the overall offense the same way that I did - they (I) appreciated the fact that it didn’t need to try to be flashy, or to “air out” the ball all the time because that’s what all the other teams were doing. CPJ did what worked, and stuck to his guns and principles. He didn’t need to put guys in the shotgun. Or to send in plays via signals. He did it his way, and he ground out the wins.
 
Top