Team Chaplain

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gt02

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I hadn't seen any D Mo speeches for this year. Seems like the Athletic Department stopped pushing out those videos.
 

gtg147g

Georgia Tech Fan
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I hadn't seen any D Mo speeches for this year. Seems like the Athletic Department stopped pushing out those videos.

D-Mo led the "We gon' fight" chant at the pep rally before he BC game in Dublin. I'll see if I can find the clip

 

gtg936g

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I hadn't seen any D Mo speeches for this year. Seems like the Athletic Department stopped pushing out those videos.


I think GT got scared when they got sued (or threatened) by the ACLU.
 

takethepoints

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Well … using funds from a state university to promote a particular religious view, even unintentionally or indirectly, is a violation of the 1st Amendment's establishment clause. Upholding that is a benefit to all of us; this is a religious country and having any government entity push any religious view is asking for trouble from everybody else. Of course, if you think your particular religion has a monopoly on salvation that's a bug, not a feature, until you remember that a whole lot of other religions have the same take on the subject. That moment's reflection will show you why the people in the state conventions - it wasn't the "Founders" - pushed for this amendment as a condition for ratifying the Constitution. Why give the government any tools to oppress religious opinion?

Private expressions - like the Rev's pep talks before games or his voluntary counseling - aren't restricted, of course, unless attendance is required and I'm betting it isn't. (My guess is that half or better of the players aren't paying any attention to the content of the speeches anyway, except for the yell lines.) Having an official chaplain on staff is border line, but probably ok as long as everything remains voluntary and no pressure is put on the athletes to participate. But putting his talks that have religious content up on an official site is another story.
 

TheSilasSonRising

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Well … using funds from a state university to promote a particular religious view, even unintentionally or indirectly, is a violation of the 1st Amendment's establishment clause. Upholding that is a benefit to all of us; this is a religious country and having any government entity push any religious view is asking for trouble from everybody else. Of course, if you think your particular religion has a monopoly on salvation that's a bug, not a feature, until you remember that a whole lot of other religions have the same take on the subject. That moment's reflection will show you why the people in the state conventions - it wasn't the "Founders" - pushed for this amendment as a condition for ratifying the Constitution. Why give the government any tools to oppress religious opinion?

Private expressions - like the Rev's pep talks before games or his voluntary counseling - aren't restricted, of course, unless attendance is required and I'm betting it isn't. (My guess is that half or better of the players aren't paying any attention to the content of the speeches anyway, except for the yell lines.) Having an official chaplain on staff is border line, but probably ok as long as everything remains voluntary and no pressure is put on the athletes to participate. But putting his talks that have religious content up on an official site is another story.

I hear ya but
- what state funds?
- and the amendment ends with (I believe) "or restarting to free exercise thereof."
 

AE 87

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Well … using funds from a state university to promote a particular religious view, even unintentionally or indirectly, is a violation of the 1st Amendment's establishment clause. Upholding that is a benefit to all of us; this is a religious country and having any government entity push any religious view is asking for trouble from everybody else. Of course, if you think your particular religion has a monopoly on salvation that's a bug, not a feature, until you remember that a whole lot of other religions have the same take on the subject. That moment's reflection will show you why the people in the state conventions - it wasn't the "Founders" - pushed for this amendment as a condition for ratifying the Constitution. Why give the government any tools to oppress religious opinion?

Private expressions - like the Rev's pep talks before games or his voluntary counseling - aren't restricted, of course, unless attendance is required and I'm betting it isn't. (My guess is that half or better of the players aren't paying any attention to the content of the speeches anyway, except for the yell lines.) Having an official chaplain on staff is border line, but probably ok as long as everything remains voluntary and no pressure is put on the athletes to participate. But putting his talks that have religious content up on an official site is another story.

Smh
 

augustabuzz

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Well … using funds from a state university to promote a particular religious view, even unintentionally or indirectly, is a violation of the 1st Amendment's establishment clause. Upholding that is a benefit to all of us; this is a religious country and having any government entity push any religious view is asking for trouble from everybody else. Of course, if you think your particular religion has a monopoly on salvation that's a bug, not a feature, until you remember that a whole lot of other religions have the same take on the subject. That moment's reflection will show you why the people in the state conventions - it wasn't the "Founders" - pushed for this amendment as a condition for ratifying the Constitution. Why give the government any tools to oppress religious opinion?

Private expressions - like the Rev's pep talks before games or his voluntary counseling - aren't restricted, of course, unless attendance is required and I'm betting it isn't. (My guess is that half or better of the players aren't paying any attention to the content of the speeches anyway, except for the yell lines.) Having an official chaplain on staff is border line, but probably ok as long as everything remains voluntary and no pressure is put on the athletes to participate. But putting his talks that have religious content up on an official site is another story.
Are state funds being used for the private corporation known as "Georgia Tech Athletic Association"? At one time it was illegal to use state funds for athletics. When did it change?
 

99jacket

Jolly Good Fellow
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I believe Derrick Moore is actually employed by FCA and is therefore not a state employee. The issue if any would arise from GT appearing to favor or promote Christianity over other religions.
 

potatohead

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Well … using funds from a state university to promote a particular religious view, even unintentionally or indirectly, is a violation of the 1st Amendment's establishment clause. Upholding that is a benefit to all of us; this is a religious country and having any government entity push any religious view is asking for trouble from everybody else. Of course, if you think your particular religion has a monopoly on salvation that's a bug, not a feature, until you remember that a whole lot of other religions have the same take on the subject. That moment's reflection will show you why the people in the state conventions - it wasn't the "Founders" - pushed for this amendment as a condition for ratifying the Constitution. Why give the government any tools to oppress religious opinion?

Private expressions - like the Rev's pep talks before games or his voluntary counseling - aren't restricted, of course, unless attendance is required and I'm betting it isn't. (My guess is that half or better of the players aren't paying any attention to the content of the speeches anyway, except for the yell lines.) Having an official chaplain on staff is border line, but probably ok as long as everything remains voluntary and no pressure is put on the athletes to participate. But putting his talks that have religious content up on an official site is another story.

Well stated and correct. However how emotionally charged some people are about this topic, you'll surely get blowback from people who cherry pick what you wrote to stir up trouble.
 

AlabamaBuzz

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Stuff like this is what is wrong with our country. As long as no one is "forced" to participate, a Chaplain making motivational speeches is NOT an issue. The founders meant for government to stay out of people's religion, not the other way around. I realize that no one should feel undue pressure to participate in something that is against their beliefs, but the secular, progressive nonsense is a scourge to our country.

God bless DMo. I appreciate his positive influence on many of our young guys, and even more on some of the guys that have not had positive role models in their lives.
 

Sideways

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Well stated and correct. However how emotionally charged some people are about this topic, you'll surely get blowback from people who cherry pick what you wrote to stir up trouble.
Nowhere in the Constitution are the words "separation of church and state" found. The idea of a wall separating church and state comes from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to a group of Baptist pastors who were concerned that the new government would force states to adhere to some kind of established religion. The first amendment makes this abundantly clear with the words "...free exercise thereof..." The first amendment guarantees freedom "of religion" not from religion. The Founding Fathers were wise in many ways permitting our citizens to be drunk or sober, Christian or Jew, religious or not.
 

potatohead

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Nowhere in the Constitution are the words "separation of church and state" found. The idea of a wall separating church and state comes from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to a group of Baptist pastors who were concerned that the new government would force states to adhere to some kind of established religion. The first amendment makes this abundantly clear with the words "...free exercise thereof..." The first amendment guarantees freedom "of religion" not from religion. The Founding Fathers were wise in many ways permitting our citizens to be drunk or sober, Christian or Jew, religious or not.

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion"

America is not a Christian country. America, as a country, has no established religion. I'm sorry. We may be predominantly Christian, but our government is not officially a Christian state. However if some of you try hard enough we can be just like Saudi Arabia and Iran, and have a state religion. #maga
 
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