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Spread Option Offense Part 1

Discussion in 'Georgia Tech Football' started by gtg936g, Jan 11, 2014.

  1. gtg936g

    gtg936g Helluva Engineer

    Messages:
    1,875
    I have always (and still do) strive to become a more knowledgeable football fan each year. I feel many here share the same desire, so I thought I would post some of the things I have learned about the offense, in the hopes that others would learn some of what we do. I would consider myself still a novice when it comes to offensive football, so I want to continue to learn and I hope the discussions here will help me as well. The information contained here is mostly available online, with the exception of a few basic diagrams that are from a playbook I obtained a few years back. As you can tell the print quality is not great in some of the attachments.

    The Base Formation:The offensive linemen line up in a three point stance, with the facemask of each lineman aligned with the Center's waist. Our splits (gaps between linemen) are typically 3' apart. The wide splits are necessary for creating lanes that facilitate runs. The diagram below shows our backs 3' off the offensive tackle positions. This spacing is evolving with new blocking rules that limit when cut blocking can be used. In some cases the backs are lined up behind the tackles.

    upload_2014-1-11_16-2-39.png

    Defensive Gaps and Techniques:
    upload_2014-1-11_17-20-19.png
    Blocking Definitions (note we do not just cut):

    upload_2014-1-11_17-25-10.png
    The Triple Option Play:
    This play gets associated with our whole offense. It is an important part of our offense, but contrary to popular belief this is not the only play we run. Let's look at the Triple option play against a typical 3-4 defense.

    Step by Step:
    At the snap of the ball the DE(#2) is intentionally unblocked. The QB is going to put the ball in the belly of the fullback (B Back in CPJs offense), and look at the body of the DE and ask himself if #2 can tackle the fullback. If the QB decides he cannot the QB hands the ball off. If the QB decides #2 is going to tackle the fullback, he pulls the ball out, and runs toward #3. The QB looks at the body of #3 (the linebacker in this case), and has to decide if #3 can tackle him. If #3 can tackle the QB he pitches the ball to the halfback.

    upload_2014-1-11_16-29-45.png
    The Rocket Toss:
    This is another staple of our offense, and a complement to the base triple option play. There are no reads in this play, but it is often a very effective play against an aggressive defense. When the triple option play or several inside run plays have been called the defense will usually get aggressive and blitz the gaps on the side toward the halfback motion. The intent here is to overwhelm one side of the offensive line, and stop the fullback at the line, or confuse the QB into keeping the ball and taking a sack. This play is often called when an inside linebacker is making the tackle on the fullback.

    Step by Step:
    The QB will take the ball and immediately pitch the ball to the halfback in motion. The intent is to get the ball to the perimeter ASAP.

    Rocket TOSS.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  2. daBuzz

    daBuzz Helluva Engineer

    Messages:
    965
    Thanks for the post.

    I have a couple of friends who are football coaches and they unanimously said that Tech doesn't really run a spread. That we like to call it a spread to keep it from being called what it really is...a veer offense. To them, a true spread offense will line up with the 2 slot backs farther outside the hash marks for the majority of the plays run, to "spread" the defense.

    There are some really interesting videos and analysis info pieces by Chip Kelly if you're interested.
    Understanding the Oregon Offense Series
    (Interestingly enough, the 4th Tutorial in that series is how they run their version of the Triple Option.

    Smart Football on Chip Kelly

    Grantland on Chip Kelly
    This article is one of the places where I've seen Kelly explains why he splits his receivers so wide:
    Good article on Kelly's background
     
  3. gtg936g

    gtg936g Helluva Engineer

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    We really do run the Veer IMO most of the time. I just called it spread option because there are some spread concepts that I want to get to later.
     
  4. ATL1

    ATL1 Helluva Engineer

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    I agree its not a spread. I'm not sure why its called a spread option.

    I always like X & O post
     
  5. nodawgs

    nodawgs Ramblin' Wreck

    Messages:
    366
    Beat me to it. If your base formation has 9 players within 6 yards of the center, it is not a spread. We dictate that the defense put at least 8 in the box on most plays. That is the opposite of a spread offense. Freeze frame right before the ball is snapped and we are in an I formation, and the A back that does not go in motion becomes the defacto TE.

    I think the whole spread option thing came from our fans wanting to feel like this offense was trendy and keeping up with the times.
     
  6. gtg936g

    gtg936g Helluva Engineer

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    1,875
    If you research the spread concept, there is a disagreement on what it means. CPJ would probably say the spread refers to the split/wr spacing.
     
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  7. nodawgs

    nodawgs Ramblin' Wreck

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    366
    Spread refers to spreading the defense out across the field using you skill players, not across the DLine. In turn pulling defenders out of the box so you can run underneath them. CPJ would be the only coach in college football to believe that OLine spacing = a spread.
     
  8. Squints

    Squints Helluva Engineer

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    1,011
    I would think that depends on how you define "spread." I've always interpreted it as forcing a defense to spread out and defend the whole field on every play. Formations, play calls, concepts, whatever doesn't matter how you do it just that you do it. If you go by that definition we definitely have some spread concepts.
     
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  9. nodawgs

    nodawgs Ramblin' Wreck

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    By that definition, every offense in the history of football is a spread. Trust me CPJ's offense is not a spread.
     
  10. gtg936g

    gtg936g Helluva Engineer

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    1,875

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spread_offense

     
    jwsavhGT likes this.
  11. AE 87

    AE 87 Helluva Engineer

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    12,104
    Base formation is a 4rx set with wide splits on the OL and wrs really wide. We use it to stress the D with an option game rather than passing primarily, but it does use a lot of spread concepts. It seems pretty petty to me to argue that it's not a spread.
     
  12. Squints

    Squints Helluva Engineer

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    Well to be honest I don't necessarily agree with that statement.

    But I don't think I was clear on what I meant. What I was meaning to point out the concepts that the offense uses to force the defense to defend the entire field is what makes it a spread. Not just that it does that.

    You gotta show me why I should just trust you because a lot of the research I've done and articles I've read say otherwise.
     
  13. gtg936g

    gtg936g Helluva Engineer

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    1,875
    This is one of the spread elements in our offense. This was used in 08, and it was part of the Southern offense from the 90s. It is a play action read off the corner. Notice the strong safety alignment in the alley making a total of 8 defenders in the box. When we ran it in 08 the A back went in motion, then reversed, and ran the route outlined. The Will never turned to follow the Aback, just continued to flow to the presumed play side.

    upload_2014-1-11_20-25-46.png
     
  14. nodawgs

    nodawgs Ramblin' Wreck

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    366
     
  15. nodawgs

    nodawgs Ramblin' Wreck

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    366
    That's a post wheel, and it's been around forever. You can run that out of a Wing-T. Not spread.
     
  16. yellojello

    yellojello Helluva Engineer

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    As does Mike Leach.
     
  17. awbuzz

    awbuzz Helluva Engineer

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    Well I've enjoyed the edu mi kay tion! I done learnt a little bit. :)

    Thanks
     
  18. gtg936g

    gtg936g Helluva Engineer

    Messages:
    1,875
    Post some formations in comparison along with a definition of what you call a spread, and why those concepts are not present in our offense. You and I have differing thoughts on the basic concept. I am not trying to be argumentative, I am just having trouble understanding where you are coming from.
     
  19. nodawgs

    nodawgs Ramblin' Wreck

    Messages:
    366
    Not being argumentative either, and I see where the confusion comes in. Basically even a standard I formation can have 5 players go out into pass patterns anywhere on the field. All offenses use the whole field through plays. Spread refers to the formations that an offense uses the majority of the time. Ask yourself if the base formations spread the whole defense out pre-snap. The purpose is to force you to play a zone and then overload the zone with route combos. If the defense tries to play man, you run rub routes to get your WRs open. You run those until the defense gets tired of getting picked and go back to exploiting the zone.

    Different spread offenses use different plays. There are however passing concepts that are shared throughout most every offense. Our passing game is more of a Prostyle isolation and timing passing game. CPJ wants man coverage, and gets it through the defense having to cheat defenders in to stop the run. Spread teams want zone. Zone defense also gives you better numbers in the box to run 1 back running plays.
     
  20. jwsavhGT

    jwsavhGT Moderator Staff Member

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    3,443
    Thanks for the post. It helps me to understand what ya'll talk about without me having to ask.
     
    gtg936g likes this.

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