ND's Kelly on cut blocks

Techster

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I would love for a reporter to ask someone like Cutcliffe and Beamer about cut blocks the week they play us, and wait for their inevitable whining about how dangerous it is and how it needs to be taken out of the game...then a run a clip of their players doing it. Would love to see their reaction to being a hypocrite. Everyone cut blocks.
 

iceeater1969

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Sure seems we have adjusted our blocking technique to not show the cut technique to quickly. In past it seemed we came off line to hit lb took 2 steps and dove at feet of lb. looking at the video of Erwin joe set up the block by selling conventional block then at just right time dive at waist which ends up in thighs - locking the defender to ground. Defender then is taken to ground and EJ bridges up and rolls to prevent recovered defender having free access to running lane = text book! We seldom saw this last year ( the selling/ block set up).

Sure the TO being crisper helps , but the blocking technique is making much bigger lanes and keeping them longer. The belly flops are gone The coaches have found and fixed some issues.

Can't wait to see how this works the rest of the season.
 

Animal02

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Sure seems we have adjusted our blocking technique to not show the cut technique to quickly. In past it seemed we came off line to hit lb took 2 steps and dove at feet of lb. looking at the video of Erwin joe set up the block by selling conventional block then at just right time dive at waist which ends up in thighs - locking the defender to ground. Defender then is taken to ground and EJ bridges up and rolls to prevent recovered defender having free access to running lane = text book! We seldom saw this last year ( the selling/ block set up).

Sure the TO being crisper helps , but the blocking technique is making much bigger lanes and keeping them longer. The belly flops are gone The coaches have found and fixed some issues.

Can't wait to see how this works the rest of the season.
I think also, with the speed at which JT is running the O, we don't need to cut them as much as simply get in their way before moving on to the next level.
 

ibeattetris

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looking at the video of Erwin joe set up the block by selling conventional block then at just right time dive at waist which ends up in thighs - locking the defender to ground. Defender then is taken to ground and EJ bridges up and rolls to prevent recovered defender having free access to running lane = text book!

Hopefully someone can cure my ignorance. On the play you mentioned, why did Joe need to cut there? I agree that is was a perfectly executes block with a great result. In this case though, Joe might have had 50 pounds on the guy he was blocking and had a full head of steam. I felt that play he could have blocked straight up and remained on his feet.

I understand AB's on the edge and backside line men. If the line man at the second level has a bad angle on the LB I get that as well, but I'd love an explanation on cutting an LB that's running right at you.
 

iceeater1969

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Not expert - but watched my son play ol through HS, college, and as ol coach in high school. Agree that conventional block would have worked if engaged and maintained but the cut block made With running lane in mind is decisive (rb vision- says accelerate off my butt) makes a bigger hole for a longer period of times and gets into head of defender.
Holding is often called on downfield blocking by linemen

The key is to not start the dive to soon!
 

Animal02

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Not expert - but watched my son play ol through HS, college, and as ol coach in high school. Agree that conventional block would have worked if engaged and maintained but the cut block made With running lane in mind is decisive (rb vision- says accelerate off my butt) makes a bigger hole for a longer period of times and gets into head of defender.
Holding is often called on downfield blocking by linemen

The key is to not start the dive to soon!
I wish we could have played like they do now......when I was playing OL, if your hands went outside of your shoulders....you were sure to get a a flag. (But I did have a mean leg whip :cool: )
 

yjack

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It would be interesting to know how the three injuries to ND defenders the article mentions occurred. It tries to imply they resulted from the blocking scheme, but doesn't come out and say it.
 

B Lifsey

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It would be interesting to know how the three injuries to ND defenders the article mentions occurred. It tries to imply they resulted from the blocking scheme, but doesn't come out and say it.
And the end of that statement - just part of a two-deep that was absolutely ravaged by injury - mean they already had several D injuries from playing other "safe" offenses? Perhaps their S&C program had issues???
 

Northeast Stinger

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It would be interesting to know how the three injuries to ND defenders the article mentions occurred. It tries to imply they resulted from the blocking scheme, but doesn't come out and say it.
Yes! There is so much lazy journalism when it comes to all aspects of the flexbone. Let's start the list here. I invite others to add:

1. It is not explosive; three yards and cloud of dust.
2. It is not good on third and long.
3. It requires small offensive linemen.
4. It is not good at coming from behind.
5. There is no "hurry up" or ability to move down the field quickly under time pressure.
6. If the defense has time to prepare for it this offense is not effective.
7. You can't recruit NFL caliber receivers for it.
8. The blocking schemes are dangerous and consistently border on the illegal.
9. It is a gimmick offense that does not work for big time programs.
 

lastoption

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10. Every play is "the triple option".
11. Running backs aren't prepared to play in NFL due setting up too close to line of scrimmage.
12. Quarterbacks are injured much more than traditional system.
 

dressedcheeseside

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Hopefully someone can cure my ignorance. On the play you mentioned, why did Joe need to cut there? I agree that is was a perfectly executes block with a great result. In this case though, Joe might have had 50 pounds on the guy he was blocking and had a full head of steam. I felt that play he could have blocked straight up and remained on his feet.

I understand AB's on the edge and backside line men. If the line man at the second level has a bad angle on the LB I get that as well, but I'd love an explanation on cutting an LB that's running right at you.
Definitely not an expert, but maybe we cut on the second level because it forces the defender to take his eyes off the ball carrier for a split second. When he does that, a different guy is likely to have the ball when he looks up again. It also forces a defender to put his hands down which creates passing lanes. A cut block also has a good chance of putting a defender on the ground. Most of the time with the speed of our qb and abacks, all we need is a second or two of disruption and the blocker has done more than enough to negate his target.
 

Animal02

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14. You cannot recruit defensive players because they have to practice against the TO all the time.

I will never forget talking to a guy I knew that was playing in "semi pro" league......right after CPJ got hired.....he was scoffing at the TO, saying it was too easy to defend and the coach would not last. :D
 

iceeater1969

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G
Real or imaginary, it is a hurdle we must overcome in recruiting.
you are right - a major downer for defense
Won't stop negative recruiting but I think the issue is the scout team and redshirt quality . It is so thin that when asked to provide credible defense against both TO and the opponents expected offense we get little of each. If we could improve the depth there - at the walk on level the scout team will make better during practice - example JHD and make the point of the negative recruiting irrelevant.

( dad bragging time- My son walked on at mcneese - 6'5" 245# kid where practiced against DE K Pittman who became high pick for Cowboys. after coaches saw my son making a very good player better son got partial, then full, then all-conference pick as senior (t310# ) - his proudest thing at that school was his first year as a walk on - mcneese won national championship and the coach
gave him a ring. He was totally motivated after that.

In the old days it was said that Nebraska's scout team was better than some college starting teams. They were a vital part of the team. What if TECH was famous for its scout team
Got to recognize and reward what you want!
Here are some ideas that cost almost nothing but would bring attention to kids and ga tech
- like at baylor have redshirt freshman and scout team walk ons do spirit jump as we get ready to kick off - camera is on them at baylor games.
- Honor outstanding walk ons in scout team to lead the wreck on field.
- Monogram the name of the walk ons next to name of starting player (the coaches think they have helped) - let TV know this is a ga tech tradition - get the scout team walk ons to sit same spot - bam they're on TV! Give them the jersey.
 

Northeast Stinger

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14. You cannot recruit defensive players because they have to practice against the TO all the time.

I will never forget talking to a guy I knew that was playing in "semi pro" league......right after CPJ got hired.....he was scoffing at the TO, saying it was too easy to defend and the coach would not last. :D
A reporter once asked Vince Lombardi what would happen if the opposing team ran a triple option offense against him. He said, "We would be totally embarrassed and look like a bunch of monkeys."
 

danny daniel

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Definitely not an expert, but maybe we cut on the second level because it forces the defender to take his eyes off the ball carrier for a split second. When he does that, a different guy is likely to have the ball when he looks up again. It also forces a defender to put his hands down which creates passing lanes. A cut block also has a good chance of putting a defender on the ground. Most of the time with the speed of our qb and abacks, all we need is a second or two of disruption and the blocker has done more than enough to negate his target.
Yes, and to defeat the cut block you need to stop your momentum, square up to the blocker, put both hands on the blocker as he lunges and usually leap backwards. This certainly disrupts your pursuit even if you defeat the block. Where the block does not work is when the ballcarrier comes within a step and a reach from a defender who is defeating the cut block.
 

ATL1

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Clemson did a good job last year of defeating cut blocks and playing displined especially early.
 
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