Duke ATL chart

Oakland

Ramblin' Wreck
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Re: Ezzard. Below is link to last weeks report on him. He was fully dressed and I saw him occasionally holding his helmet. Didn’t look hurt but with Collins’ injury report paranoia you never know what’s going on.

Thanks for the info. Interesting.
 

bobongo

Helluva Engineer
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3,697
AJC (Suguira) on the depth chart (linked below). White looks BIG in the photo. Hopefully, he’s a terror on the field, and he’s ready to play.
I’m not sure about the OL, but at least Cooper is back on the list. Hopefully, he’s 100%. That’s one of the biggest factors in the game (to me).
He mentions Griffin being out, but that there’s less of a need for DTs in a 3-3-5. I see other NCAA defenses swap to different formations during a game, but for a while it seems like we’ve decided that there’s only one defensive formation we can handle at a time. I know that you “have to get your base down”, but we’ve already “learned” the 4-2-5, and I’m not sure why we can’t occasionally swap in a DT and swap out an LB or nickel.

From the article:

"Three other players – Jared Ivey, Josh Robinson and Sylvain Yondjouen – are listed with White at defensive end, which is separate from the rush end grouping of Jordan Domineck, Kevin Harris, Kyle Kennard and Noah Collins."

My dumb question for the day: What is the difference between "defensive end" and "rush end"?
 

ramblin_man

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I also believe the ATL is a way to mess with opposition because GCG thinks it adds an element of “mystery” for the opposing teams to “prepare solely” for tendencies within specific 1-2 players at each position vs. not really knowing who is going to be there week to week to some small extent. Plus it “dangles a 🥕” for our own players to push themselves each and every week (ideally) to maintain their names or get their names above the threshold to make the ATL. I do believe that when we win at a consistent level the ATL could be huge in developing depth at highly visible positions instead of having set depth charts w/o opportunities to move and get “burn” on the field. Instead of having to sit and wait their turn or weigh options in the portal.
 

kg01

Get-Bak! Coach
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My dumb question for the day: What is the difference between "defensive end" and "rush end"?

Ah man, everybody knows that. That's an easy one.

Who me? Oh of course I know what that is ..

ws.gif
 

IM79

Jolly Good Fellow
Messages
285
From the article:

"Three other players – Jared Ivey, Josh Robinson and Sylvain Yondjouen – are listed with White at defensive end, which is separate from the rush end grouping of Jordan Domineck, Kevin Harris, Kyle Kennard and Noah Collins."

My dumb question for the day: What is the difference between "defensive end" and "rush end"?
Rush end usually plays upright. The other end puts his hand on the ground. That’s usually for 4 man line. Not Sure how they do a 3-3-5
The "weak side" end or "rush end" however, is the end man on the line of scrimmage. Because he is a blind-side pass rusher against right handed QBs and because of his alignment, this DE needs to be a real athlete (an "ah-thu-leete", if you will):

The open side Defensive End has to be one of your best football players. Size does not matter as much. We want an athletic player who can move around.
 

MidtownJacket

Helluva Engineer
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Ah man, everybody knows that. That's an easy one.

Who me? Oh of course I know what that is ..

ws.gif
@bobongo Not to belabor the expert commentary you already got, but generally speaking the Rush End and Defensive End have slightly different responsibilities (beyond obviously being the end of the DLine) regardless of 3 or 4 down lines.

Typically a "Defensive End" is going to be bigger and often lines up opposite a Tight End they have responsibility for stopping the run on that side of the line and typically don't have to be as fleet of foot.

A "rush end" will be opposite the DE and has more rush responsibility (obviously less in a 335 stack than the 425 sets based on what LBs are asked to do).

A good, and deeper/better read can be found On Bleacher Report Here
 

MidtownJacket

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Rush end usually plays upright. The other end puts his hand on the ground. That’s usually for 4 man line. Not Sure how they do a 3-3-5
The "weak side" end or "rush end" however, is the end man on the line of scrimmage. Because he is a blind-side pass rusher against right handed QBs and because of his alignment, this DE needs to be a real athlete (an "ah-thu-leete", if you will):
There you have it, my snark was sniped by a strong post. Didn't see this come through as I was looking for the link I added. It shows the difference in roles based on the DLine front we present with 3 or 4 DLs
 

kg01

Get-Bak! Coach
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@bobongo Not to belabor the expert commentary you already got, but generally speaking the Rush End and Defensive End have slightly different responsibilities (beyond obviously being the end of the DLine) regardless of 3 or 4 down lines.

Typically a "Defensive End" is going to be bigger and often lines up opposite a Tight End they have responsibility for stopping the run on that side of the line and typically don't have to be as fleet of foot.

A "rush end" will be opposite the DE and has more rush responsibility (obviously less in a 335 stack than the 425 sets based on what LBs are asked to do).

A good, and deeper/better read can be found here: https://www.dawgsbynature.com/2011/...the-rush-end-the-power-end-and-defensive-line

Well, I mean, if you wanna get all technical and specific and whatnot ...
 

TromboneJacket

Ramblin' Wreck
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Seattle, WA
From the article:

"Three other players – Jared Ivey, Josh Robinson and Sylvain Yondjouen – are listed with White at defensive end, which is separate from the rush end grouping of Jordan Domineck, Kevin Harris, Kyle Kennard and Noah Collins."

My dumb question for the day: What is the difference between "defensive end" and "rush end"?
Similar to what others have said, it appears that what we simply call a “Defensive End” is what other teams might call a Strongside Defensive End (or SDE), Big End, or 5T. The guy usually lined up across from the gap between the Right Tackle and Tight End. Think Michael Bennett, JJ Watt, Calais Campbell, Jason Pierre-Paul (no idea why he’s listed as a LB at that size), etc.

The Rush End is also called a LEO, Weakside Defensive End (WDE), or Edge. In a 3-4 defense, this player is often a linebacker. This is generally your best 1-on-1 outside pass rusher. Think Khalil Mack, Von Miller, Cliff Avril, Vic Beasley, Chandler Jones, etc. This guy usually lines up across from the Left Tackle’s outside shoulder. Since he usually doesn’t have to deal with those pesky tight ends, he is the guy who just has one man to beat and plenty of space to do so.
 

SteamWhistle

Basketball School
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Rome, GA
From the article:

"Three other players – Jared Ivey, Josh Robinson and Sylvain Yondjouen – are listed with White at defensive end, which is separate from the rush end grouping of Jordan Domineck, Kevin Harris, Kyle Kennard and Noah Collins."

My dumb question for the day: What is the difference between "defensive end" and "rush end"?
Pass Rushers and Edge Setters, SDE vs WDE
 

GCdaJuiceMan

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Idk how much White will play/contribute Saturday but I sure am glad to see him on the depth chart ahead of the hokie game. He terrorized that team 2 years ago and that game is mainly the reason we all got so excited about him.
 

danny daniel

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Rush end usually plays upright. The other end puts his hand on the ground. That’s usually for 4 man line. Not Sure how they do a 3-3-5
The "weak side" end or "rush end" however, is the end man on the line of scrimmage. Because he is a blind-side pass rusher against right handed QBs and because of his alignment, this DE needs to be a real athlete (an "ah-thu-leete", if you will):

My football experience is a little dated so I would appreciate a little help. From these posts and the referenced article I get the impression that the SDE is left side DE and the WDE is right side (presuming a right handed QB). From my older experience the SDE was the strong side of the D (most often the wide side of the field) away from the nickel and the WDE was on the weak side of the D (probably most often short side of the field). Which is it or do teams do either?
 

GTpdm

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Well, I mean, if you wanna get all technical and specific and whatnot ...
Well, before all these other fonts chimed in, I was going to say,”Duh…the defensive end is always making excuses for a bad play, and the rush end is always in hurry to dodge blame for a bad play.”

1633729635072.gif

(Sorry. I’m already several rounds into Happy Hour…)
 
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TromboneJacket

Ramblin' Wreck
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Seattle, WA
My football experience is a little dated so I would appreciate a little help. From these posts and the referenced article I get the impression that the SDE is left side DE and the WDE is right side (presuming a right handed QB). From my older experience the SDE was the strong side of the D (most often the wide side of the field) away from the nickel and the WDE was on the weak side of the D (probably most often short side of the field). Which is it or do teams do either?
It really depends on the team. Some teams don’t even make a distinction between the two DEs and their roles. Sometimes the same player will take on different roles at different times (e.g. I believe the Bengals used Carlos Dunlap as a SDE in the past, but the Seahawks currently use him as a LEO). Clowney has played both roles at different times I believe. Sometimes the alignment is based on how the coordinator thinks the offense will line up or whether it’s an obvious run situation or passing situation (Pete Carroll loves to line up an extra SDE player in the 3T position on 3rd and long). What I do find a bit odd about our 3-3-5 sets is that we have guys like Domineck and Kevin Harris (both of whom have prototypical LEO traits) playing as one of the down linemen, whereas typically in a 3-4 defense the 3 linemen would be a NT and a pair of SDE type players while the LEO presents as a linebacker.
 

iceeater1969

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I also believe the ATL is a way to mess with opposition because GCG thinks it adds an element of “mystery” for the opposing teams to “prepare solely” for tendencies within specific 1-2 players at each position vs. not really knowing who is going to be there week to week to some small extent. Plus it “dangles a 🥕” for our own players to push themselves each and every week (ideally) to maintain their names or get their names above the threshold to make the ATL. I do believe that when we win at a consistent level the ATL could be huge in developing depth at highly visible positions instead of having set depth charts w/o opportunities to move and get “burn” on the field. Instead of having to sit and wait their turn or weigh options in the portal.
Saw that one of the top db recruits was very happy to see that cgc rotates in dbs as he want to get a shot at early playing time.
 

Wrecked

Jolly Good Fellow
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I also believe the ATL is a way to mess with opposition because GCG thinks it adds an element of “mystery” for the opposing teams to “prepare solely” for tendencies within specific 1-2 players at each position vs. not really knowing who is going to be there week to week to some small extent. Plus it “dangles a 🥕” for our own players to push themselves each and every week (ideally) to maintain their names or get their names above the threshold to make the ATL. I do believe that when we win at a consistent level the ATL could be huge in developing depth at highly visible positions instead of having set depth charts w/o opportunities to move and get “burn” on the field. Instead of having to sit and wait their turn or weigh options in the portal.
The ATL is a gimmick, nothing more nothing less. We have had players play that were not on the list, and players on the list who are injured and couldn't play. If it works to mess with opponents or impress recruits, fine. I personally like an old fashioned depth chart because if "competition is king" what better way to compete than knowing who you have to beat out to start.
 
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