Covid in Student Athletes

GTNavyNuke

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Interesting findings from OSU, seems these athletes aren't nearly as resistant as some like to think.

We still have a lot to learn about the long term effects of COVID-19. It's only been a year so it's impossible to really know; but it ain't the flu.

It would be interesting to see the athletes VO2 Max before and after. Most people don't know their VO2 Max but these guys should.
 

Techster

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We still have a lot to learn about the long term effects of COVID-19. It's only been a year so it's impossible to really know; but it ain't the flu.

It would be interesting to see the athletes VO2 Max before and after. Most people don't know their VO2 Max but these guys should.

One of the best college basketball players in the country collapsed during a live televised basketball game at the beginning of the CBB season. It was later discovered that along with his teammates, he caught Covid previously, and has myocarditis. Luckily, there wasn't any catastrophic loss with the player, and he has returned to the team in a limited capacity. For privacy reasons, UF hasn't been able to discuss the player's condition outside of he's returned to the team (although not physically playing or practicing yet). Let's hope UF is able to privately share the finding with doctors and scientist as it would go a long way in helping everyone with the long term results of the virus, and how we can protect players of all sports...and also how to treat them after catching Covid.

 

GTNavyNuke

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In the cycling world, the cyclists are really really avoiding getting COVID. But their VO2 Max is their livelihood. Not just lip service.

If this collateral damage to the heart / brain / kidneys is a real problem long term there will be lots of studies documenting the impact. This was a limited group study but consistent with other limited studies ( https://www.scientificamerican.com/...ur-heart-even-if-you-havent-had-any-symptoms/ )

Given how many people smoke and over eat despite the worse health implications, I doubt that population will care much about COVID impacts and will downplay any results. I just want to get vaccinated ASAP.
 

AlabamaBuzz

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One of the best college basketball players in the country collapsed during a live televised basketball game at the beginning of the CBB season. It was later discovered that along with his teammates, he caught Covid previously, and has myocarditis. Luckily, there wasn't any catastrophic loss with the player, and he has returned to the team in a limited capacity. For privacy reasons, UF hasn't been able to discuss the player's condition outside of he's returned to the team (although not physically playing or practicing yet). Let's hope UF is able to privately share the finding with doctors and scientist as it would go a long way in helping everyone with the long term results of the virus, and how we can protect players of all sports...and also how to treat them after catching Covid.


I predict there will be numerous athletes who sue for damages related to this - I know that legislation has been put in place to protect certain entities, but I believe attorneys will still go after many schools for not laying out this risk in a tangible way to the athletes.
 

AlabamaBuzz

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In the cycling world, the cyclists are really really avoiding getting COVID. But their VO2 Max is their livelihood. Not just lip service.

If this collateral damage to the heart / brain / kidneys is a real problem long term there will be lots of studies documenting the impact. This was a limited group study but consistent with other limited studies ( https://www.scientificamerican.com/...ur-heart-even-if-you-havent-had-any-symptoms/ )

Given how many people smoke and over eat despite the worse health implications, I doubt that population will care much about COVID impacts and will downplay any results. I just want to get vaccinated ASAP.
I sure wish they would speed up the vaccine process. We are seeing a tremendous uptick, but I guess it was to be expected with holidays. I am a 57 year old who does take statins and has a PVC heartbeat, so I am hoping that I can be prioritized at least by March or so, but who knows?
 
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yeti92

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I sure wish they would speed up the vaccine process. We are seeing a tremendous uptick, but I guess it was to be expected with holidays. I am a 57 year old who does take statins and has a PVC heartbeat, so I am hoping that I can be prioritized at least by March or so, but who knows?
Absolutely, there are tons of people who are at high risk if they become infected that need to be vaccinated sooner rather than later. I feel extremely lucky that the stars aligned perfectly and I was able to get the vaccine this past week - I expect if I were to have waited until my demographic was offered it, it would be 6 months or more from now.
 

orientalnc

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Given how many people smoke and over eat despite the worse health implications, I doubt that population will care much about COVID impacts and will downplay any results. I just want to get vaccinated ASAP.
This is a good point, but I look at it a little differently. If you are 18 and smoking, or overeating, the consequences are decades away. It's easy for a young person to brush aside those risks as something to consider today. Once you have COVID the risk of myocarditis is next month in some cases. That is an attention getter. But, if you already think you are immortal and the risk of getting COVID symptoms are low, then maybe nothing really matters. Do as you please and take your chances. It bothers me that there are people in leadership positions encouraging young people to engage in risky behaviors.

Like you, I am getting vaccinated.
 

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Interesting findings from OSU, seems these athletes aren't nearly as resistant as some like to think.

Because the other half of the story is left out - a near100% recovery rate. Before Covid, heart issues existed, players collapsed, and student athletes died. It was equally rare. My guess is with the UF player it’s been kept quiet because they still don’t know everything. He had COVID several months ago. You’re supposed to be cleared by doctors before you can play again. There have been hundreds of football players across the country who got Covid, a few of which who had heart issues, They all recovered.

My guess is given he was probably cleared several months ago, so they’re trying to still figure out if this is a separate case of heart issues, or if it somehow came back.

The combined total amount of deaths from the Flu + Covid for those under 18 is LESS than it normally is.
 

forensicbuzz

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Because the other half of the story is left out - a near100% recovery rate. Before Covid, heart issues existed, players collapsed, and student athletes died. It was equally rare. My guess is with the UF player it’s been kept quiet because they still don’t know everything. He had COVID several months ago. You’re supposed to be cleared by doctors before you can play again. There have been hundreds of football players across the country who got Covid, a few of which who had heart issues, They all recovered.

My guess is given he was probably cleared several months ago, so they’re trying to still figure out if this is a separate case of heart issues, or if it somehow came back.

The combined total amount of deaths from the Flu + Covid for those under 18 is LESS than it normally is.
MiSC is not rare. It is dangerous. It has long-lasting effects. You need to stop minimizing the potential risks to younger people.
 

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MiSC is not rare. It is dangerous. It has long-lasting effects. You need to stop minimizing the potential risks to younger people.

I’m not trying to minimize anything - I’m sorry if it came off that way. But we’re talking about less than a handful of people out of thousands and thousands.
 

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Well, of the 5 kids I know who have had CoViD19, 3 have had serious complications associated with MiSC. So, I'm not so sure about a handful ouf of thousands and thousands.

Oh my bad, I thought you were talking about heart issues in athletes. Yes the immune issues some kids have had are perhaps in the hundreds - I haven’t looked in awhile. It’s still far less deadly than the flu in young people with far less hospitalizations too. Doesn’t mean it’s problem free though for sure.
 

orientalnc

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Oh my bad, I thought you were talking about heart issues in athletes. Yes the immune issues some kids have had are perhaps in the hundreds - I haven’t looked in awhile. It’s still far less deadly than the flu in young people with far less hospitalizations too. Doesn’t mean it’s problem free though for sure.
You have made this point frequently and I am not disputing the data, but young people are not a discrete group. While the virus has far less serious impact on their lives, they can and do transmit the disease to older people. Controlling the spread of the virus is the epidemiological goal.
 

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You have made this point frequently and I am not disputing the data, but young people are not a discrete group. While the virus has far less serious impact on their lives, they can and do transmit the disease to older people. Controlling the spread of the virus is the epidemiological goal.

Kind of. When the swine flu was declared a pandemic, the CDC ordered all testing to stop. Why? Because we already knew it was then a pandemic, and it wasn’t much more deadly than the regular flu, and as such didn’t need significantly more attention. It’s all about hospitalizations and death. Indeed we should always endeavor to limit the spread.
 

MidtownJacket

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Kind of. When the swine flu was declared a pandemic, the CDC ordered all testing to stop. Why? Because we already knew it was then a pandemic, and it wasn’t much more deadly than the regular flu, and as such didn’t need significantly more attention. It’s all about hospitalizations and death. Indeed we should always endeavor to limit the spread.
I worry more about the after-effects of the disease. My SiL is a Doctor in VA and has had numerous cases where they had to stop surgery directly after anesthesia before beginning the procedure because of lung capacity issues only to find out the person had contracted Covid and was symptom free.

Throw in the loss of smell and taste is tied to brainstem function and I don't want to get anywhere near this thing.
 

ncjacket79

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I’m not trying to minimize anything - I’m sorry if it came off that way. But we’re talking about less than a handful of people out of thousands and thousands.
If the study turns out to be accurate, 30% and 15% are not “less Thames handful”
 

ncjacket79

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Kind of. When the swine flu was declared a pandemic, the CDC ordered all testing to stop. Why? Because we already knew it was then a pandemic, and it wasn’t much more deadly than the regular flu, and as such didn’t need significantly more attention. It’s all about hospitalizations and death. Indeed we should always endeavor to limit the spread.
My recollection of swine flu is that it was similar to regular flu in that a person had symptoms before they were contagious. That’s one of the game changers of COVID
 

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If the study turns out to be accurate, 30% and 15% are not “less Thames handful”

Sorry, I didn’t mean the number of people who get Covid, I meant who have complications down the road. Every single person I’ve ever read about who initially had a complication cleared up within a few weeks.

This guy had Covid several months ago, then was cleared afterwards as he had no heart effects or otherwise. Then several months later he does. If someone can have some sort of relapse due to Covid a long long time down the road out of the blue, that would indeed be a bad sign. And not just because it would be impossible to diagnose too. You could get Covid without symptoms and never even know you should be monitored closely for essentially forever. We’d need to do a full heart study on every single person like every few weeks forever.
 
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