Chip Long Offense Video (Tulane)

slugboy

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The video is just 18 minutes long. It's worth a watch. While I love a fan breakdown, there are a bunch of places where I said "nah, that's not quite right", so watch with your own eyes and figure out what makes sense.

With the debate about starters going on in another thread, I wanted to see what the QB reads were like, what the blocking was like, and who was in the game.

Long uses a lot of motion. It looks like he wants to force the defense to check into their second or third choice and get away from what they planned on doing.

There are a bunch of places where Long bunches 3 eligible receivers (a WR and 2 TE's, for example) and/or runs routes that might not be pick plays, but they rub a lot. Instead of using space like a spread offense, he's bunching and rubbing.

There are several places where he finds the holes in a zone D, though.

There are only a few plays where one RB is in at tailback and another one is in at the slot, so if he's got talented RBs that can catch, he'll run 11 or 12 personnel but still get two backs on the field.

He has a lot of 2 TE sets. I wouldn't be shocked to see 3 TE sets. Those TEs better be ready to play because Long likes to use them a lot. He uses an H-Back sometimes. Even though I'm an old-school fullback fan, it looks like Long uses a TE for that kind of lead blocker.

Tulane's blocking against Oklahoma didn't look stellar, but Tulane's QB looked in these successful plays like he didn't have to do a lot of thinking to go through his progressions, and make a decision quickly. The plays seemed to develop quickly, but Tulane's QB didn't seem to have to rush through his choices like QBs at Pitt or UVA. So, either Tulane had a heady QB, or the offense didn't seem complicated to them. The offense seemed complicated enough to OU, though.

On one of the touchdowns, Long overloaded the right side with extra blockers, and Tulane looked like they still missed 3-4 blocks. Somehow, the RB still scored. The plays are good, but we have to block better than Tulane did.

Receivers do some "run and shoot" style decision-making. Our receivers and our QB need to make the same reads or we'll see some interceptions.

Total side point--Oklahoma seemed to run a 4-2-5, and their LBs seemed to be confused a lot. I can't tell you how much of this film is OU not being in the right places vs Tulane's plays being good, but I think it leans a little more to Tulane's plays being good.

There were limitations of the Tulane offense, but at least I watch it and see a consistent idea of how the offense is supposed to work, and the QB, OL, WRs, TEs, and RBs are all on the same page. While there were way too many missed or quickly shed blocks, people were moving in the right right direction and had the right idea of what their assignments are. It doesn't look discombobulated.

Based on the personnel he used here, TEs are going to be on the field a lot, and only the best WRs are going to get action.
 

iceeater1969

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Thanks for content
Mid year at tail gate w player families, the tightend group was wondering when they would get the ball.. They felt under utilized.
It's a good sign that Leonard is at ACC meeting.
Leonard's parents said the weight goal for their son was hard to meet - eat all the time.
 

MidtownJacket

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Agree with your analysis @slugboy I also liked seeing him set up concepts to later exploit.. He ran those crossing drag routes consistently then waited for the LBs to over pursue on them and hit the safety valve route nicely for a good 1st down pickup.

Also love seeing the flexibility he has with the RB in the slot, and running legit routes (not just leaking out as a check down). Should be fun to watch this season our boys in white and gold doing it up!
 

slugboy

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I've watched a lot of 4-2-5 defenses show up against the "spread RPO" offenses, like almost everyone in the ACC is running. I think the heavy sets with 2 TEs and the occasional H-back aren't as hard to prepare for as a flexbone, but they're a change of pace and require defensive adjustments. We might get a little edge from different formations.
 

Techfan02

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I said this when we hired chip long and even during last season but Key did not like P nut, so this will help the offense run more smooth than last year. I've also gone over a few games and can just see certian things not lining up as they should have, but the one thing I saw was us being able to move the ball in the 5-20 yard range efficently.
 

alagold

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The video is just 18 minutes long. It's worth a watch. While I love a fan breakdown, there are a bunch of places where I said "nah, that's not quite right", so watch with your own eyes and figure out what makes sense.

With the debate about starters going on in another thread, I wanted to see what the QB reads were like, what the blocking was like, and who was in the game.

Long uses a lot of motion. It looks like he wants to force the defense to check into their second or third choice and get away from what they planned on doing.

There are a bunch of places where Long bunches 3 eligible receivers (a WR and 2 TE's, for example) and/or runs routes that might not be pick plays, but they rub a lot. Instead of using space like a spread offense, he's bunching and rubbing.

There are several places where he finds the holes in a zone D, though.

There are only a few plays where one RB is in at tailback and another one is in at the slot, so if he's got talented RBs that can catch, he'll run 11 or 12 personnel but still get two backs on the field.

He has a lot of 2 TE sets. I wouldn't be shocked to see 3 TE sets. Those TEs better be ready to play because Long likes to use them a lot. He uses an H-Back sometimes. Even though I'm an old-school fullback fan, it looks like Long uses a TE for that kind of lead blocker.

Tulane's blocking against Oklahoma didn't look stellar, but Tulane's QB looked in these successful plays like he didn't have to do a lot of thinking to go through his progressions, and make a decision quickly. The plays seemed to develop quickly, but Tulane's QB didn't seem to have to rush through his choices like QBs at Pitt or UVA. So, either Tulane had a heady QB, or the offense didn't seem complicated to them. The offense seemed complicated enough to OU, though.

On one of the touchdowns, Long overloaded the right side with extra blockers, and Tulane looked like they still missed 3-4 blocks. Somehow, the RB still scored. The plays are good, but we have to block better than Tulane did.

Receivers do some "run and shoot" style decision-making. Our receivers and our QB need to make the same reads or we'll see some interceptions.

Total side point--Oklahoma seemed to run a 4-2-5, and their LBs seemed to be confused a lot. I can't tell you how much of this film is OU not being in the right places vs Tulane's plays being good, but I think it leans a little more to Tulane's plays being good.

There were limitations of the Tulane offense, but at least I watch it and see a consistent idea of how the offense is supposed to work, and the QB, OL, WRs, TEs, and RBs are all on the same page. While there were way too many missed or quickly shed blocks, people were moving in the right right direction and had the right idea of what their assignments are. It doesn't look discombobulated.

Based on the personnel he used here, TEs are going to be on the field a lot, and only the best WRs are going to get action.
I love the idea of having a LOT of motion.It takes timing/coaching but it puts a bunch of pressure on the DEF.
Interesting about the extended use of TEs when none have excelled much so far. ex--Reminds me of the run play at Clemson goal-line when the block wasn't made on the LB..
Of course this is only hope if the OL doesn't step up.
 
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